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CHCDIS009 Facilitate ongoing skills development

CHCDIS009
Facilitate ongoing skills development using a person-centred approach
Release 1
Total Training Solutions Adelaide Assessments

Learning checkpoint 1
Identify individual skill development needs

This learning checkpoint allows you to review your skills and knowledge in identifying individual skill development needs.

Part A

  1. Explain what is meant by person-centred practice.
  2. Explain what is meant by the ‘social model of disability’.
  3. Describe how social role valorisation enhances a person’s competency and social image as a means of addressing devaluation.
  4. Describe how people with disability can maintain their rightful place in the community.
  5. Identify and describe two local community education opportunities and their potential use in capacity building.

Part B

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study

Ronald is 77 years old and has just returned from hospital after a stroke. He lives on his own since his wife passed away three years ago. As a result of the stroke Ronald has some difficulty with balance and has to walk with the aid of a walking frame. Ronald was a sports journalist prior to his retirement and has also always taken an interest in local history and in genealogy.

Susanna, a support worker, has been sent to assess Ronald’s needs and to put in place support services to help him regain his sense of independence. Susanna conducts a formal assessment and discusses an individual plan with Ronald. Ronald tells Susanna that he wants to become more confident going out in the community. He tells Susanna it is time he took up his hobbies again. He also agrees that it may be useful to have some physiotherapy to help with walking and balance.

  1. Describe how Susanna could identify and assess Ronald’s skill development needs using a person-centred approach (assessment processes relating to on-going skill development).
  2. Describe how Susanna should document Ronald’s assessment outcomes.
  3. Identify two skill development opportunities Susanna could recommend to Ronald.
  4. Who could Susanna collaborate with to identify Ronald’s skills development opportunities?
  5. Identify and describe two specialist services Susanna could access or make a referral to in order to help Ronald gain a sense of independence.

Learning checkpoint 2
Plan person-centred, ongoing skill development

This learning checkpoint allows you to review your skills and knowledge in planning person-centred, ongoing skill development.

Part A

  1. Explain how person-centred activities enable self-determination for the person with disability.
  2. Describe one way to document ongoing skill development in the individual plan of a person with an intellectual disability or cognitive impairment.

Part B

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study

Josephine is an 18-year-old person with an intellectual disability. She wants to move out of her parents’ home and into low-care group home in the community. Josephine has the full support of her parents who are partnering with her and her disability support worker, Alice, to find a home that suits Josephine’s needs and preferences.

Alice accompanies Josephine and her parents to visit a group home that is only 10kms from Josephine’s parents’ house. There are three other people with intellectual disability living in the home, as well as a room for disability support workers to stay when on roster. Josephine is very excited and her parents are comfortable with the arrangement. Alice sits down with Josephine and her parents to discuss the best ongoing care for Josephine to ensure she lives in a safe, happy and home-like environment. Alice collaborates with Josephine to plan ongoing person-centred skill development activities that will assist Josephine to participate equally in community life. Josephine says her number-one priority is to improve her social skills and form long-term relationships.

  1. What communication techniques should Alice use to engage with Josephine in identifying her learning goals?
  2. Describe two learning strategies or opportunities Alice could use to address Josephine’s learning goals.
  3. Identify and describe two ongoing person-centred skill development activities that could assist Josephine to achieve her learning objective to improve her social skills and form long-term relationships.
  4. Describe two people whom Alice could seek input or advice from to ensure Josephine’s learning objectives, performance expectations and criteria for achievement are realistic, and the training is sequenced in the most beneficial way.

Learning checkpoint 3
Implement person-centred, ongoing skill development strategies

This learning checkpoint allows you to review your skills and knowledge in implementing person-centred, ongoing skill development strategies.

Part A

  1. Explain what is meant by ‘active support’.
  2. Explain what is meant by ‘strengths-based practice’.

Part B

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study

Kathleen is a supervisor with an organisation that provides services to older people and people with disability. Kathleen is asked if she can meet with a person in need of support, Duane, who has had a stroke and is about to return home. Kathleen will assess what services Duane needs to be put in place to assist with his rehabilitation.

Kathleen visits Duane and talks to him about his needs. Duane’s goal is to regain full mobility so he can continue to live on his own. As a result of the stroke, Duane’s balance is impaired and he is very slow and unsure in his movements.

Kathleen talks to Duane for about an hour and discusses an ongoing individual plan with him. They decide he needs home care twice a week and personal care every morning until he gains enough confidence to be able to shower himself. Duane tells Kathleen that he wants to continue his weekly session with a physiotherapist as part of his rehabilitation. She encourages him to do this, suggesting she arrange transport as part of his program. Kathleen also suggests she organise a walking frame for Duane to use around the house to help with his balance.

Upon returning to the office Kathleen draws up a person-centred plan and enters Duane’s details on the database. She phones two support workers, Jenny and Pallini, to organise home care and personal care, briefing both on Duane’s goal of becoming independent and the details of his program. These details are recorded on Duane’s care plan for the support workers to see. Kathleen also organises the hire of a walking frame, ensuring it is there when Duane arrives home from hospital.

Jenny calls on Duane twice a week to provide home care. She gets on well with Duane and he often chats to her about how he used to go swimming in the bay each morning. Jenny suggests that Duane may like to try swimming again as part of his rehabilitation. After completing her shift, Jenny makes a note of this conversation in the communication book and gives Kathleen a call to tell her.

Pallini assists Duane to shower each morning. Duane undresses in the bedroom and then uses his walking frame to go to the bathroom where Pallini assists him to sit on a shower chair. She turns the water on for him and he can then wash himself.

In the second week, Duane decides he will try walking to the bathroom without the walking frame. Pallini assists and he manages to walk to the shower chair on his own. Pallini records this in the communication book so Jenny will know. She also phones Kathleen to tell her of Duane’s progress, which Kathleen notes on Duane’s development plan.

  1. List at least two things that Kathleen and the support workers did to encourage Duane and show him respect in the implementation of his development plan.
  2. What equipment and resources did Kathleen access for Duane? Consider both human resources and equipment.
  3. What information needed to be shared? With whom and by what means?
  4. What evidence needed to be recorded by Kathleen and where would it be recorded?

Learning checkpoint 4
Evaluate skill development and review plan

This learning checkpoint allows you to review your skills and knowledge in evaluating the effectiveness of ongoing skill development and updating the plan to meet the changing needs of the person.

Part A

  1. Explain the difference between formal and informal monitoring of a person’s skill development.
  2. What is the purpose of providing feedback on a person’s skill development?
  3. Describe two tips for providing feedback to a person with disability.
  4. Describe two tips for providing feedback to a carer or family member.

Part B

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study

Rose is an older person with a visual impairment who lives alone. Her disability support worker, Denise, visits twice a week to help her with the grocery shopping and to go with Rose to her weekly choir rehearsal. Rose visits her local library once a week to borrow audio books. The library is only 500 metres from Rose’s home and she uses a guide cane to walk there unaccompanied.

Walking to the library one day, Rose trips over a hose that was left out on a neighbour’s driveway and falls over. Denise lodges an incident report and as a result, Rose’s skill development plan is being reviewed to minimise the risk of her falling over again.

Rose’s daughter, Melanie, is concerned about Rose’s safety and tells Denise she does not think Rose should continue to leave the house unaccompanied in the future. Rose is upset by this as she wishes to maintain a reasonable level of independence. Denise meets with Rose and Melanie to discuss Rose’s skill development plan and brainstorm how Rose can continue to visit the library safely on her own.

  1. Explain the process Denise should follow in reviewing, evaluating and making changes to Rose’s skill development plan.
  2. Identify two opportunities of ongoing skill development for Rose.

Learning checkpoint 5
Use incidental learning to enhance skill development

This learning checkpoint allows you to review your skills and knowledge in identifying and implementing incident learning opportunities to enhance skills development.

Part A

  1. Describe the differences between formal, informal and incidental learning.
  2. Identify and describe two strategies for informal or incidental learning.
  3. Identify and describe two types of feedback that can be given to a person with disability to assist and encourage their learning.

Part B

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study

Ralph was in a car accident two years ago and he suffered a spinal injury. As a result he lost the use of both his legs and now relies on a wheelchair for mobility. Ralph has recently moved into an independent group home with three other people who have physical disabilities. He is still learning how to be fully independent and requires some assistance from a disability support worker to help him dress for work each morning. Ralph finds the most difficult task is putting on his socks and shoes.

Tony is one of the workers who supports Ralph to develop his skills and maintain his independence. Ralph tells Tony that he would like to start dressing himself unassisted, including putting on his socks and shoes. While Ralph does not yet feel confident to perform this task alone, he becomes impatient if he has to wait for others to assist him. Ralph says that being able to dress himself will give him the confidence to take more risks in completing other activities.

  1. Describe how Tony could assist Ralph to take initiative in learning situations.
  2. What could Tony use as a motivational reward for Ralph?
  3. When would it be appropriate for Tony to stop assisting Ralph to get dressed and encourage Ralph’s experiential learning and development?

Final assessment

How to work through this final assessment

This final assessment is designed to assess your performance of competency for the unit CHCDIS009 Facilitate ongoing skills development using a person-centred approach, Release 1. Your assessor or workplace supervisor will help you fully understand assessment requirements for this unit.

The features of this final assessment are detailed in the following table.

Feature of the assessment resource

Explanation

Assessment information and scope

This section provides details of the unit of competency covered, setting out information about the aims of the unit, what areas are covered, how the assessment tasks must be completed and how the assessment is conducted.

Are you ready for assessment?

This section provides you with the opportunity to self-assess your performance, to ensure that you are ready to commence the assessment process.

Final assessment overview

This section provides an outline of the final assessment tasks to be covered.

Assessment plan

Your assessor will discuss the assessment tasks with you and may also customise the assessment tasks to suit specific requirements where needed.

Final assessment tasks

This section outlines the final assessment tasks in detail, including the relevant documentation you need to complete and submit along with your final assessment tasks.

Record of outcome

As you progress through the final assessment tasks, your assessor will use the record of outcome to confirm your performance and provide relevant advice and feedback.

Further information

Before you commence your final assessment tasks, you should review the information provided by your training organisation about assessment. You should not commence your final assessment tasks until you have read and understood this information. Your training organisation must also provide information about assessment while on practical placement, including specific time lines.

Assessment information and scope

Who is the final assessment designed for?

The final assessment is designed for candidates to demonstrate their competency having completed formal learning experiences in this unit. Assessment may occur in real and/or simulated work environments. Candidates may be undertaking the unit in a range of learning situations, including private study, via a traineeship arrangement or via other workplace-supported means.

What are the aims of the final assessment tasks?

This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to plan, implement and review formal and informal ongoing skills development, in collaboration with a person with disability and incorporate into the person’s individualised plan.

This unit applies to workers in varied disability contexts. Work performed requires a range of well developed, person-centred skills where some discretion and judgement is required and workers will take responsibility for their own outputs.

The key outcomes are:

• Identify individual skill development needs

• Plan person-centred, ongoing skill development

• Implement person-centred, ongoing skills development strategies

• Evaluate skills development and review plan

• Identify and implement incidental learning opportunities to enhance skills development

Prerequisites and
co-requisites

None

Legislative and licensing requirements

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian/New Zealand standards and industry codes of practice.

Are you ready for assessment?

You must ensure that you are ready to begin the final assessment. Complete the following self-assessment checklist to confirm that you hold the skills and knowledge required and feel ready to undertake a successful final assessment.

 

Topic

Key outcomes

I am able to perform skills and demonstrate knowledge satisfactorily in the following tasks.

q Topic 1 Identify individual skill development needs

q 1A Identify the person’s skill development needs using a person-centred approach

q 1B Document assessment outcomes according to organisation guidelines

q 1C Identify skill development opportunities in collaboration with person and relevant others

q 1D Make referrals to other staff or specialist services

q Topic 2 Plan person-centred, ongoing skill development

q 2A Engage the person with disability in identifying their learning goals

q 2B Identify learning strategies to address the person’s goals

q 2C Develop formal person-centred skill development or maintenance activities with relevant others

q 2D Document ongoing skill development or maintenance in the person’s individual plan

q Topic 3 Implement person-centred, ongoing skill development strategies

q 3A Work with the person to implement skill development strategies in a respectful, motivating and empowering manner

q 3B Ensure individual skill development or maintenance plan is implemented consistently

q 3C Access and use equipment and resources to facilitate learning

q 3D Document outcomes in the person’s individual plan

q Topic 4 Evaluate skill development and review plan

q 4A Monitor the person’s development and provide feedback about their progress towards learning objectives

q 4B Review records and update plan to meet changing needs

q 4C Identify opportunities for ongoing skill development

q Topic 5 Use incidental learning to enhance skill development

q 5A Identify informal learning opportunities and encourage learning

q 5B Provide prompt and constructive advice in an appropriate format

q 5C Provide encouragement when the person takes initiative

q 5D Withdraw support to an appropriate level to encourage experiential learning

If you have covered and feel confident in all of these areas, you are ready to proceed to the final assessment.

Before you commence the assessment process, discuss with your assessor or workplace supervisor any areas you do not feel confident in or have not covered.

Final assessment overview

To demonstrate your competency using this final assessment you must successfully complete both theory and practical assessment tasks.

Complete the following task using this learner guide

• Part A – Questions

You will demonstrate a sound knowledge of the unit requirements in your responses.

• Part B – Case study questions

You will demonstrate a sound knowledge of the unit requirements in your responses.

Refer to the Aspire Practical placement logbook for this unit

• Practical placement

Your performance will be assessed in the workplace.

Final assessment tasks

Part A – Questions

Purpose

You will demonstrate a sound knowledge of the unit requirements in your responses.

Instructions to the candidate

All questions must be answered satisfactorily for Part A to be completed satisfactorily.

There is no restriction on the length of the question responses, or time restriction in completing the assessment.

You must complete all questions unassisted by the assessor or other personnel, but may refer to reference material as needed.

Resources required

The question responses section is the only resource required for this questioning assessment to be completed.

Assessment conditions

Skills must have been demonstrated in the workplace or in a simulated environment that reflects workplace conditions. The following conditions must be met for this unit:

• Access to individualised plans and any equipment outlined in the plan

• Recognised assessment and planning tools

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015/AQTF mandatory competency requirements for assessors.

Reasonable adjustment

If you do not wish to respond to the questions in written form, an interview may be used as an alternative approach if negotiated with your assessor.

Question 1

What are two benefits of using a person-centred approach when identifying the skill development needs of a person with disability?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 2

Explain the concept of person-centred practice.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 3

Explain the social model of disability.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 4

Explain how competency and image enhancement address devaluation so that a person with disability can take their rightful place in community.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 5

Describe three assessment processes relating to ongoing skill development.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 6

Identify the most common formal assessment tool and describe how is it is used.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 7

When using informal assessment processes, what steps should be taken if you notice a person you are supporting can no longer do something that they were able to in the past?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 8

List common types of organisational documents which should guide a community support worker when documenting development needs.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 9

Identify two local community education opportunities and explain how they could be used to build the capacity of a person with disability.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 10

List three different skill sets and match them to the relevant specialists available to address the learning needs of people with disability.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 11

Provide three examples of how you would use appropriate language when engaging a person in identifying learning goals.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 12

What is self-determination and how does applying this principal improve support and opportunities for a person with disability?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 13

Describe how an active support approach assists a person with disability to acquire new skills, and how it leads to learning experiences which are motivating.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 14

Explain the benefit of using strengths-based practice for adult learning.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 15

When you are monitoring a person’s ongoing skills development, what principles of assessment should your method follow and what are the benefits of keeping to these principles?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 16

Identify two examples of opportunities for incidental learning and explain what skills a person you are supporting may be able to develop in these settings.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 17

Describe a strategy for withdrawing support from a person you are supporting so that they may be encouraged in experiential learning.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Question 18

When deciding to withdraw support slowly from a person who is learning a new skill, what responsibility should you consider and what should you assess?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Assessor to complete

Feedback

All questions must be satisfactorily answered by the candidate as per the marking guide in the Trainer’s and assessor’s guide. The questioning assessment has been confirmed:

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Please include recommendations for future training / action in cases where the candidate has not satisfactorily achieved all criteria:

Declaration

I declare that this questioning assessment has been conducted as per the training organisation’s assessment procedures and the instructions provided for this assessment task, and that I have provided appropriate feedback to the candidate.

Assessor name

 

Assessor signature

 

Date marked

 

Part B – Case study questions

Purpose

You will demonstrate a sound knowledge of the unit requirements in your responses.

Instructions to the candidate

All questions must be answered satisfactorily for Part B to be completed satisfactorily.

There is no restriction on the length of the question responses, or time restriction in completing the assessment.

You must complete all questions unassisted by the assessor or other personnel, but may refer to reference material as needed.

Resources required

To complete this part of the assessment, you will need:

• the question responses section.

Assessment conditions

Skills must have been demonstrated in the workplace or in a simulated environment that reflects workplace conditions. The following conditions must be met for this unit:

• Access to individualised plans and any equipment outlined in the plan

• Recognised assessment and planning tools

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015/AQTF mandatory competency requirements for assessors.

Reasonable adjustment

If you do not wish to respond to the questions in written form, an interview may be used as an alternative approach if negotiated with your assessor.

Candidate to complete

Candidate name

 

Date of assessment

 

Assessment declaration

I declare that no part of this assessment has been copied from another person’s work, except where clearly noted on documents or work submitted.

I declare that no part of this assessment has been written for me by another person. I understand that plagiarism is a serious offence that may lead to disciplinary action by my training organisation.

Candidate signature

 

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study (questions 1–5)

Marie has vision impairment as a result of an industrial accident two years ago. Twelve months ago Cheryl set up a person-centred plan in collaboration with Marie that includes a skill development plan. Marie has been having trouble adjusting to her vision impairment; she is experiencing difficulty finding her way around and has asked for assistance to become more skilled in navigating unfamiliar spaces.

Under the plan, Marie’s main goal is to regain her independence so she can return to her work as a translator of English, Italian and French. Her plan initially includes receiving some home care, rehabilitation training and some occasional assistance to access the community. Her priorities are to learn to use a guide cane and then progress to having a guide dog.

Cheryl organises a referral to an organisation that specialises in retraining people with vision impairment. Marie enrols in formal training to learn independent living skills and how to use a cane. Once this is achieved she will be put on the waiting list for a guide dog. Cheryl briefs the organisation’s trainer on Marie’s needs and prepares information for the support worker, Brian, whom she assigns to Marie.

Brian comes to Marie’s house twice a week to provide home care. Although she is initially cautious of him, after a while Brian and Marie start to get on well. One day Marie asks Brian to help her rearrange her clothes in the wardrobe so all the dark colours are at one end and the light ones are at the other end. Brian says it sounds like a great idea and assists Marie to rearrange things. He then works with her to help her identify which is which by touch. Brian says, ‘Feel the surface. Is it wool or cotton? Is it hanging with the dark or light colours?’ This helps Marie identify her clothes.

Marie asks Brian to go shopping with her to help her buy some new clothes. She wants to have lots of black as it will go with anything. Before they go, Brian shows Marie how to measure her notes with a device that can distinguish currency by the size of the paper. Once they have measured the notes, Brian shows Marie how to fold the $20 notes in half and the $50 notes at a diagonal so she can tell the difference when she goes shopping.

CS Question 1

How do Cheryl and Brian collaborate with Marie to identify skill development opportunities?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 2

How does Cheryl collaborate with others to identify skill development opportunities for Marie?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 3

Describe two local community education opportunities Marie could participate in, and their potential use in capacity building.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 4

Explain who Brian could make a referral to if Marie wanted to develop skills in preparing nutritious meals for herself, and why a referral would be necessary.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 5

How could Brian identify a range of learning strategies and opportunities that most appropriately address Marie’s skill development goals?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study (questions 6–8)

John is a person with an intellectual disability. He has recently gained part-time employment at the local library where he is responsible for collecting returned books and placing them back where they belong on the shelves. John needs things to be organised and placed in alphabetical or numerical order where possible, and because of this he is very proficient in his role.

Casey is the disability support worker who has been assigned to John. She meets with him twice a week in his home to monitor and discuss his skill development plan. One day, John excitedly tells Casey that a new position has opened up at the library for a records management assistant. The role involves maintaining, securing and distributing records kept in the library’s historical archives. John tells Casey that he wants to apply for the role as it offers more working hours, a higher salary, and would mean a promotion for John. Casey agrees to help John update his résumé and formally apply for the role. Casey also makes enquiries with a Registered Training Organisation to discuss the possibility of John completing a vocational course in records management.

CS Question 6

How could Casey use a person-centred approach to develop formal ongoing skill development activities for John?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 7

Identify the relevant personnel that Casey should consult to develop formal ongoing skill development activities for John.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 8

How should Casey document ongoing skill development in John’s individual plan?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study (questions 9–12)

Katie was born with congenital amputation. She has no legs and must rely on a wheelchair for mobility. Katie has recently completed high school where reasonable adjustments were made to ensure she enjoyed a safe, fair and equitable secondary education. Katie was supported by the school’s disability support worker, Aaron, who developed and maintained an individual plan outlining the person-centred care and support provided to Katie from grade 7 to grade 12. Katie completed her year 12 certificate at the top of her year group and has been accepted into a university 100 kilometres from her home to study medicine.

Katie and her parents meet with Sasha, a disability support worker employed by the university, to discuss how the university can accommodate Sasha’s needs and make adjustments to ensure she has access to the same services and treatment as all other students. Sasha works with Katie and her parents to develop an ongoing skill development plan that will help Katie adapt to university campus life and assist her to live independently in the university’s wheelchair accessible student housing facility. Sasha introduces Katie to Denise, the student housing manager, and Marcus, the faculty of medicine coordinator.

CS Question 9

Identify the colleagues and relevant others whom Sasha must inform and support to implement Katie’s ongoing skill development plan.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 10

How could Sasha ensure that Katie’s ongoing skill development plan is in line with her individual plan from secondary school?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 11

How could Sasha identify the equipment and resources Katie requires to achieve the learning objectives set out in her skill development plan?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 12

How could Sasha inform others of changes to skill development outcomes in Katie’s individual plan?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study (questions 13–15)

Chad is a person with cerebral palsy. Chad lives alone and is visited once a week by James, a disability support worker. It is important to Chad to maintain an active lifestyle. One year ago, Chad and James worked together to develop an ongoing skill development plan that included Chad’s learning objective of exercising for 30 minutes per day.

James sought specialist advice from an exercise physiologist and an occupational therapist to create an exercise program for Chad relative to his abilities. Chad’s goals are to improve cardiovascular conditioning, increase strength, encourage flexibility, maintain a healthy body weight, and balance blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Not only does Chad walk for at least 30 minutes per day, but he also attends aqua therapy classes twice a week.

In addition to his exercise program, Chad would like James to help him develop a balanced diet plan so he can spend every Monday preparing healthy, nutritious meals for the week. James tells Chad that he will organise a registered dietitian to help with meal planning, diets and food preparation tailored for Chad’s needs and preferences.

CS Question 13

Describe three reasons why James might need to review Chad’s records in order to evaluate the effectiveness of his skill development plan.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 14

What process could James follow to evaluate the effectiveness of Chad’s ongoing skill development plan, use Chad’s records and update the plan to meet Chad’s changing needs?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 15

Explain two types of ongoing skill development opportunities (outside of formal training) that James could identify for Chad.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

Read the case study, then answer the questions that follow.

Case study (questions 16–19)

Jenny is a person with an intellectual disability. She has recently moved into a group home with four other people with physical and intellectual disability. Jenny meets with her disability support worker, Sven, twice a week to discuss her care and support needs and carry out skill development activities that form part of Jenny’s individual plan.

Jenny is employed at her local supermarket where she is responsible for maintaining and restocking the fruit and vegetable section. Jenny enjoys her job and confidently answers questions from customers about fruits and vegetables available at the store. Jenny’s manager is so impressed with her diligence and commitment to her job that she has decided to support and pay for Jenny to complete a Certificate III in food handling through an accredited on-the-job training program. Jenny’s manager speaks to Sven about the opportunity and he immediately discusses the idea with Jenny. Jenny is thrilled and tells Sven she would like to enrol straight away.

Sven includes the vocational course in Jenny’s skill development plan and develops a series of activities that will ensure Jenny can complete her certificate in a fair and equitable manner. Sven coordinates with Jenny, her manager and a trainer who will be observing and assessing Jenny at her workplace, to implement Jenny’s individual plan. Sven plans on providing Jenny with constructive advice and feedback throughout her training and assessment to ensure she stays focused and committed to completing her course.

CS Question 16

Why is it important for Sven to provide Jenny with constructive feedback as soon as possible?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 17

Identify the relevant people Sven may also need to provide with appropriate constructive advice, to ensure Jenny’s skill development learning objectives are achievable.

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 18

How could Sven encourage Jenny when she takes initiative in learning situations?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

CS Question 19

When would it be appropriate for Sven to withdraw his support of Jenny to an appropriate level in order to encourage experiential learning and development?

Answer

 

Marking

q Satisfactory

q Unsatisfactory

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