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HAS 954 Sociology of Food and Nutrition

Faculty of Social Sciences 	 
School of Health and Society 
University of Wollongong 
HAS 954 Sociology of Food and Nutrition 
Autumn 2020 

SUBJECT DETAILS

Subject Description

This subject enables students to apply theoretical concepts of sociology with respect to social, cultural and environmental food contexts. Students will apply these sociological frameworks to the factors influencing foodways along with the associated food behaviours at the individual, community and population levels. Students will draw upon this knowledge to create efficient and equitable solutions to address population and planetary health outcomes.

Subject Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this subject, students will be able to:

Subject Learning Outcomes

1. Identify and explain a range of sociological models associated with food practices.

2. Explore how food environments shape and are shaped by beliefs, attitudes and food choice practices at local, national, and global levels.

3. Examine historical, social, cultural, environmental, economic and political influences on foodways.

4. Critique the ethics and politics of food production and consumption in terms of current foodways challenges

5. Design and advocate an approach to address one of the factors influencing foodways to support efficient and equitable population and planetary health outcomes.

Student Workload

Students should note that UOW policy equates 1 credit point with 2 hours of study per week, including lectures and tutorials/workshops/practicals, self-directed study and work no assessment tasks. For example, in a 6 credit point subject, a total of 12 hours of study per week is expected.

Extraordinary Changes to the Subject Outline

In extraordinary circumstances the provisions stipulated in this Subject Outline may require amendment after the Subject Outline has been distributed. All students enrolled in the subject must be notified and have the opportunity to provide feedback in relation to the proposed amendment, prior to the amendment being finalised.

Learning Analytics

“Where Learning Analytics data (such as student engagement with Moodle, access to recorded lectures, University Library usage, task marks, and use of SOLS) is available to the Subject Coordinator, this may be used to assist in analysing student engagement, and to identify and recommend support to students who may be at risk of failure. If you have questions about the kinds of data the University uses, how we collect it, and how we protect your privacy in the use of this data, please refer to https://www.uow.edu.au/about/privacy/index.html.

Subject Outline Version Control

Version history and subject improvements

Ist edition

Dr Anne McMahon, School of Health and Society, UOW

First time subject offered

2020

ELEARNING, READINGS, REFERENCES AND MATERIALS

Major Text

A Sociology of Food and Nutrition - the social appetite 4th edition Oxford Press South Melbourne 2017

Recommended Reading

The following references complement the prescribed readings and textbooks available as ebooks through UoW library:

Whitney E, Rolfes S, 2017 Understanding Nutrition Australian and New Zealand 3rd Edition; Wadsworth-Thomson Learning, South Melbourne Victoria

  1. Tapsell (Ed.) 2013 Food, Nutrition and Health 2nd Edition Oxford University Press. Victoria.

This is not an exhaustive list. Students are encouraged to use the UOW Library catalogue and databases to locate additional resources including the e-readings list: https://ereadingsprd.uow.edu.au/

References

Ereadings will be placed on the library subject site for review linked to relevant weeks

This is not an exhaustive list. Students are encouraged to use the UOW Library catalogue and databases to locate additional resources.

Subject eLearning

The University uses the eLearning system Moodle to support all coursework subjects. The subject Moodle site can be accessed via the eLearning link in SOLs. SOLs can be accessed from this page: https://www.uow.edu.au/student/index.html

You can find guidelines to eLearning here https://www.uow.edu.au/student/learningcoop/index.html

WORKSHOPS

Flexible delivery: Workshops 3 hours per week in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12

Current timetable information is located at http://www.uow.edu.au/student/timetables/index.html

Minimum Attendance Requirements

Students are expected to watch all online lectures. Attendance records (completion of online activities) are kept for all classes and students are required to complete a minimum of 80% of all online lecture activities. Where attendance is affected due to illness or misadventure an application for academic consideration should be lodged. Failure to comply with mandatory minimum attendance requirements may constitute grounds for the award of a grade of Technical Fail (TF) in this subject.

Lecture Schedule

This is a guide to the lecture topics however the delivery date of these topics may on occasion vary due to unforeseen circumstances, such as the availability of a guest lecturer or access to other resources.

Week

Beginning

(Monday)

SLO

Topics covered

Readings

Tasks Due

Week 1

2 March

No workshop

Week 2

9 March

1&2

On campus workshop

Reviewing sociology food and nutrition, relationsip with food behaviour and the framing of food choice from an evolutionary perspective and a food policy perspective

L. Tapsell (Ed.) Food, Nutrition and Health 2nd edition South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. Nutrition Chapter 20

Germov and Williams: Ch 1, pp.3-14: Exploring the social appetite

Chapter 3.3 The Sociology of Food

Jean-Pierre Poulan

Poulan JP The Sociology of Food: eating and the place of food and

society: Ch 3, pp.41-62

Pinstrup-Andersen, Per, and II, Derrill D. Watson. Ch 1 and 10 pp 1.15,278304.

Complete designated online activity

Assessment 1:Online Discussion 1

Students to nominate into groups for Assessment 2 and Assessment 3

Groups to nominate the preference for:

Assessment 2 pro or con position in relation to a statement on a food choice position

Assessment 3: One of the identified social responses to food environment challenges

Week 3

16 March

No workshop

Week 4

23 March

2, 3,4

On campus

workshop

Exploring the history of food and the relationship with identity as

Historical view of food and how it changes over time to reflect culture and identity A Sociology of Food and Nutrition - the social appetite 4th edition Oxford Press South Melbourne 2017 Chapter 7

Complete designated online activity

Assessment 1:Online

Discussion 2

well as the impact of colonisation on Aboriginal food cutlure and the broader implications of

decolonisation

Chapter 1.2 The Sociology of Food

Jean-Pierre Poulan

L. Tapsell (Ed.) Food, Nutrition and Health 2nd Edition South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.

Chapter 16 (to be released 18 March 2019)

Week 5

30 March

No workshop

Week 6

6 April

3,4

On campus workshop

Examining the causes of world hunger and critiquing social responses to food insecuirty including the exploring the implications of unsustainable food production and politics within the food system

Germov and Williams: Ch 2, pp.1932:The food system: food politics, production and distribution

Stuckler D, Nestle M (2012) Big

Food, Food Systems, and Global Health. PLOS Medicine 9(6)

Complete designated online activity

Assessment 1:Online Discussion 3

MID SESSION RECESS 13 -17 APRIL

Week 7

20 April

No workshop

Assessment 2: Debate on line – Group submission around group position on a designated food choice pattern (20 %)

Week 8

27 April

On campus workshop

Understanding food risk, food regulation as well as culinary cultures and technology influences on food behaviour

Poulan JP The Sociology of Food: eating and the place of food and society: Ch 4; 67-75

Germov and Williams: Ch 5, pp.75-86 The Politics of dietary advice

Germov and Williams: Ch 6, pp.91105 Food labelling and information battlefield

Germov and Williams: Ch 8, pp.129141 Culinary cultures of Europe: food, history, health and identity Back in time for Dinner ABC

Complete designated online activity

Week 9

4 May

No workshop

Assessment 2: Debate on line – Group rebuttal on opposing submission from week 7 (10%)

Week 10

11 May

2,3

Oncampus workshop

Germov and Williams: Ch 9, pp.145164 Humans food and other animals

Complete designated online activity

Exploring social origins of foodism, and implications of social class and social expectations on food behaviour lifestages such as ageing and reproduction and child rearing

Germov and Williams: Ch 11, pp.187-197 Food class and identity

Germov and Williams: Ch 10, pp.170-181 Food and ageing Nicklas Neuman, et al, Food, Culture & Society.2019; 22:1: 45-62, DOI:

10.1080/15528014.2018.1547066

Assessment 1: Online

Discussion 4

Week 11

18 May

No workshop

Week 12

25 May

2,3,5

Oncampus workshop

Exploring gender body ideals stigmatism, alcohol consumption as well as relationshps of food consumption with environment, waste management and

sustainability

Germov and Williams: Ch 14, pp.232-252 Gender food and the body

Germov and Williams: Ch 15, pp.259-268 Sociological analysis of the stigmatisation of obesity

Mark Gibbson ed. Food and Society Chap 20-21

Germov and Williams: Ch 13

Complete designated online activity

Assessment 3 Part A Group presentation 20%

in workshop

Week 13

I June

No workshop

Assessment 3 Part B

Individual report 30%

8 June –12

June

Study Recess

13 June – 25

June

Exam Period

Section B: Assessment

ASSESSMENT TASKS

Minimum Performance Requirements

All assessment tasks must be submitted. To achieve a passing grade in the subject students must achieve a total mark of 50% or over and obtain a minimum of 45% in each task weighted 40% or higher ed. Students who do not meet the minimum performance requirements (i.e. complete all assessment tasks) will be given a TF (Technical Fail) grade on their Academic Transcript.

See the General Course Rules at http://www.uow.edu.au/handbook/generalcourserules/index.html

Requirements Related to Student Contributions

Group assignments are typically assessed as a group product, usually with the same mark allocated to each group member. However, the subject co-ordinator reserves the right to allocate individual marks for students for an assessment task when necessary (for example, in cases where contributions of group members have been unequal).

Referencing

The Harvard referencing system is used in the School of Geography & Sustainable Communities and the School of Health & Society. The APA referencing system is used in the School of Education and the School of Psychology. These are also known as author-date systems due to the order of the information presented. Failure to document adequately and fully is to ignore scholarly rules – and run the risk of plagiarism. Please consult the UOW library website for further information:

https://www.library.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@lib/documents/doc/uow220276.pdf

Academic Integrity

The University’s policy on acknowledgement practice and plagiarism provides detailed information about how to acknowledge the work of others: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058648.html

The University’s Academic Integrity Policy, Faculty Handbooks and subject guides clearly set out the University’s expectation that students submit only their own original work for assessment and avoid plagiarising the work of others or cheating. Re-using any of your own work (either in part or in full), which you have submitted previously for assessment, is not permitted without appropriate acknowledgement or without the explicit permission of the Subject Coordinator. Plagiarism can be detected and has led to students being expelled from the University.

The use by students of any website that provides access to essays or other assessment items (sometimes marketed as ‘resources’), is extremely unwise. Students who provide an assessment item (or provide access to an assessment item) to others, either directly or indirectly (for example by uploading an assessment item to a website) are considered by the University to be intentionally or recklessly helping other students to cheat. Uploading an assessment task, subject outline or other course materials without express permission of the university is considered academic misconduct and students place themselves at risk of being expelled from the University.

Assessment 1

Online discussions

Due Date

Online discussion 1 – 15th March 2020 by 2300 hrs

Online discussion 2 - 29th March 2020 by 2300 hrs

Online discussion 3 - 12th April 2020 by 2300 hrs

Online discussion 4 - 17th May 2020 by 2300 hrs

Description

Online discussion – Two (2) out of the four (4) submitted discussions will be marked

Online discussion 1 – due 15th March: Discussion around explanation of food practices in terms of a theoretical sociology model

Online discussion 2 – due 29th March: Discussion around a description of how either local, national or global environment’s influence beliefs, attitudes and food choice and vice versa

Online discussinon 3 – due 12th April; Discussion around how politics might have influenced food policy at the local national or global level and the ethical implications of those influences

Online discussion 4 – due 17th May: Discussion around the arguments for and against from the debate – Assessment 2 (including student’s previous position) and provide critique post-debate about the most convincing evidenced based argument

Weighting

20 % of final Grade

Format / Length / Duration

150 word individual submission per online discussion within nominated section on the HAS 954 eLearning site for weeks 2, 4, 6 and 10. Minimum two critiquing replies to other students submissions per each online submission

Assessment Criteria

Each marked discussion (out of 10 % for a total of 20 %) will be assessed as follows:

1. Demonstrated understanding of the topic being discussed inclusive of materials reviewed such as relevant readings (4 marks)

2. Expression of a cohesive argument to make an original/novel observation of the topic area supported by literature/policy within word limit (4 marks)

3. Engaging, interacting and facilitating a constructive discussion with other students (2 Mark)

Subject Learning

Outcomes Assessed

1,2,3,4

Method of Submission

Four individual on line discussions to be submitted within nominated section on the HAS 954 eLearning site for weeks 2, 4, 6, and 10.

10

Assessment 2

Online debate

Due Date

Part A: Debate on line – Group submission around group position due 26 April, 1800 hrs

Part B: Debate on line – Group rebuttal on opposing submission due 10 May 2020, 1800 hrs

Description

Online debate (30%)

Part A

Group position on food choice pattern (20%): Part A of this assessment item is group work submission. Students will be assigned to work in pairs or a group of 3 people during the workshop in week 2 around an assigned statement (provided by tutor) on a food choice patterns e.g. veganism, flexitarian, paleo. Your group will debate against another group on the assigned statement on the food choice pattern and will be designated as either for or against the assigned statement. You will need to develop your argument based on an evidence based ethical position. Each group is expected to organise their own meeting times and record meeting notes for each meeting inclusive of action points for each member through Moodle Chat Room.

The group submission (Part A) needs to be based on factual scientific information, review of any appropriate statistics or data on the food choice pattern being investigated and any environmental, historical, social, cultural, economic or political factors (supported by evidence) that might have influenced the adoption or rejection of the food choice pattern being investigated. Each group must identify what part of the argument each member is to investigate. Each group member will then prepare and present their arguments in written form. The final submission for the group needs to include a cohesive argument based on the group members’ investigations, topped and tailed with the group’s overarching position.

Each group member needs to prepare a written argument agreed with the group to enable a clear cohesive argument for the group to be submitted. The summaries from each group member will be combined as a group assessment and submitted through Turnitin in your Moodle site. Ensure all meeting notes are posted to your Moodle Chat Room.

Part B

Online debate rebuttal (10%): Part B of this assessment will be a group rebuttal report on the opposing team’s position on the food choice pattern debated. The final submission for the rebuttal needs to include each group member’s response combined into one submission inclusive of references. The Rebuttal will be submitted through Turnitin in your Moodle site.

Both Part A and B need group submissions needs to be structured as per Assessment Criteria below.

Weighting

30 % of final Grade

Part A Group position (20%)

Part B Group Rebuttal (10%)

Format / Length / Duration

Two group submissions from each group.

Part AGroup submission around group position

Each group will submit a single document (1500 words maximum not including references). This single document needs to include each group members agreed argument (expect 500 - 750 words per group member not including references).

Part BGroup Rebuttal

Each group will submit a single document (750 words maximum not including references). This single document needs to include each group members agreed rebuttal argument (expect 200 - 375 words per group member not including references).

Format of both submissions to be double line spaced and minimum of 12 point font and submitted through Turnitin by the due date.

Assessment Criteria

Part AGroup submission around group position (20 %) assessment criteria as follows:

1. Comprehensive identification of the group’s position for the food choice pattern being investigated inclusive of any environmental, historical, social, cultural, economic or political factors that might have influenced the adoption or rejection of the food choice pattern being investigated

2. Demonstrated ability to clarify the evidence inclusive of peer reviewed literature, appropriate statistics or data on the food choice pattern, and any relevant policy, economic or regulation that supports or opposes the food choice being investigated.

3. Demonstrated ability to develop a coherent argument inclusive of all members’ perspectives.

4. Report layout, grammar, quality of references, and correct referencing according the Harvard style guide

5. Group Meeting minutes, notes and action point/s summary for the group meetings also need to be submitted through Moodle Chat room by the due date.

Part BGroup Rebuttal (10%)

1. Comprehensive professional response to the opposing group’s presented argument using evidenced sourced for Part A

2. Demonstrated ability to clarify the group’s final position.

3. Demonstrated ability to develop a coherent rebuttal inclusive of all members’ perspectives.

4. Report layout, grammar, quality of references, and correct referencing.

5. Group Meeting minutes, notes and action point/s summary for the group meetings also need to be submitted through Moodle Chat room by the due date.

Please note: all group members are equally responsible for the quality of the work produced by the group. Each group member needs to attend group meetings through online platform for example Adobe Connect Lounge Practice rooms set up in Moodle and should read through the material being submitted for the group assignment. Peer marking may be used if there are problems with group dynamics. However, any issues need to be discussed with the subject coordinator two weeks before the due date for the work.

Subject Learning

Outcomes Assessed

2,3

Method of Submission

Part A Group position and Group meeting notes to be submitted to Subject Coordinator via Moodle Assignment on 26 April 202 by 1800 hrs

Part B Group rebuttal position and Group meeting notes to be submitted to Subject Coordinator via Moodle Assignment on 10 May 2020 by 1800 hrs

The Group position, Group meetings and Group rebuttal is to be submitted via Turnitin links in the elearning site. That is, Group position, Group meetings and Group rebuttal assessment tasks have been set up to be checked by Turnitin, a tool for checking if it has unreferenced content. You can submit your assessment task to Turnitin prior to the due date and Turnitin will give you an originality report. You can then make any changes that may be required and re-submit you final version by the due times on the 26th April (Part A) and

10th May (Part B).

Assessment 3

Group presentation on examination and critique of identified social response to food environmental challenges

Due Date

Part A: Group presentation during nominated time starting week 12

Group presentation summary due online on 26th May 2020 by 1330 hrs

Part B: Individual report Sunday 31st May 2020, 2300 hrs

Description

Part A

Group presentation (20%): Part A of this assessment item is group work.

Students will be assigned to work in pairs or a group of 3 people in the workshop in week 2. Each group will be assigned an identified social response to a food environment challenge. Each group is expected to organise their own meeting times and record meeting notes for each meeting inclusive of action points for each member through Moodle Chat Room. The presentation needs to be based on factual scientific information, review of current statistics on the social response to the food environment challenge being investigated and any appropriate historical, social, cultural, environmental, economic, political influence underpinning the response. The presentation must also account for any ethical, policy or regulation issues that might need to be addressed to support an efficient, equitable and sustainable approach to be delivered. Each group member needs to prepare and present their arguments orally and in written form. Written form for each group member consists of ½ - 1page of the main points and references used. The summaries will be combined as a group assessment and submitted through Turnitin. A soft copy of PowerPoint presentation slides and the written meeting notes are to be submitted via Moodle before the presentation is conducted.

Part B

Individual report (30%): Part B of this assessment will be a 1500 word individual report on the social response to the food environment challenge you have been assigned. The report needs to be structured as per Assessment Criteria as follows.

Weighting

50 % of final Grade

Part A Group presentation (20%)

Part B Individual Report (30%)

Format / Length / Duration

12 minute group presentation in workshop 6 (3 minutes per group member and 3 minutes for group questions for expected 12 minutes per group of 3 members). Presentations are expected to use PowerPoint. Groups are expected to provide max. ½ page of main points (with references) per group member and a complete copy of Power Point slides presented PLUS copy of group meeting notes.

Individual report. 2000 words maximum (excluding references) report to be double line spaced and minimum of 12 point font and submitted through Turnitin by the due date.

Assessment Criteria

Part A Group presentation (20 %) assessment criteria as follows:

1. Presentation skills

a) Use of aids (if relevant) and verbal delivery across the team. This includes the ability to respond to any questions

b) Content of the presentation

c) Ability to present scientifically based information and engage the class

2. Written material

Each group will submit one group summary report. The group summary report needs a title page identifying the social response to the food environment challenge being investigated and the group membership student details. Each student is expected to contribute a ½ -1 page summary of their individual main points and the associated references each student has used to support their points presented. A soft copy of PowerPoint presentation slides and the written meeting notes are to be submitted via Moodle before the presentation is conducted.

Please note: all group members are equally responsible for the quality of the work produced by the group. Each group member needs to attend group meetings through online platform for example Adobe Connect on Moodle and should read through the material being submitted for the group assignment.

Peer marking may be used if there are problems with group dynamics. However, any issues need to be discussed with the subject coordinator two weeks before the due date for the work

Part B Individual report (30%)

1. Comprehensive identification of the social response to the food environment challenge the student has been assigned to investigate and critical review of the key aspects that need to be addressed.

2. Demonstrated ability to clarify the impact of the social response to the food environment challenge to enhance or worsen the issue it has been designed to address, and ability to clarify social, cultural, environmental, economic, political elements might be strengthened or changed to support better health ethically and sustainability in the population being reviewed.

3. Critical discussion around evidence based approaches inclusive of theoretical evidence to address the issues identified (in Part B 1 and 2) for the social response to the food environment challenge being investigated inclusive of the potential strengths and weaknesses of the approach/s reviewed.

4. Report layout, grammar, quality of references, and correct referencing style

Subject Learning

Outcomes Assessed

2-5

Method of Submission

PowerPoint slides and Group meeting notes to be submitted to Subject Coordinator via Moodle Assignment on 26th May 2020

The Group Presentation Summary and the Individual Report is to be submitted via Turnitin links in the elearning site. That is, the Group Presentation Summary and the Individual Report assessment tasks have been set up to be checked by Turnitin, a tool for checking if it has unreferenced content.

You can submit your assessment task to Turnitin prior to the due date and Turnitin will give you an originality report. You can then make any changes that may be required and re-submit you final version by the due times on the 31st May 2020.

UOW Grade Descriptors

The UOW Grade Descriptors are general statements that communicate what our grades represent, in terms of standards of performance, and provide a frame of reference to ensure that assessment practice across the University is appropriate, consistent and fair. Grade Descriptors are expressed in general terms so that they are applicable to a broad range of disciplines. For more information on the UOW grade descriptors see:

http://www.uow.edu.au/curriculum-transformation/aqc/uowgradedescriptors/index.html

Grade

Mark

(%)

Descriptor

High

Distinction

HD

85-100

For performance that provides evidence of an outstanding level of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes, demonstrating the attributes of a distinction grade plus (as applicable) one or more of the following:

consistent evidence of deep and critical understanding

substantial originality and insight in identifying, generating and communicating competing arguments, perspectives or problem-solving approaches

critical evaluation of problems, their solutions and their implications

use of quantitative analysis of data as the basis for deep and thoughtful judgments, drawing insightful, carefully qualified conclusions from this work

creativity in application as appropriate to the discipline

eloquent and sophisticated communication of information and ideas in terms of the conventions of the discipline

consistent application of appropriate skills, techniques and methods with outstanding levels of precision and accuracy

all or almost all answers correct, very few or none incorrect

Distinction

D

75-84

For performance that provides evidence of a superior level of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes, demonstrating the attributes of a credit grade plus (as applicable) one or more of the following:

evidence of integration and evaluation of critical ideas, principles, concepts and/or theories

distinctive insight and ability in applying relevant skills, techniques, methods and/or concepts

demonstration of frequent originality in defining and analysing issues or problems and providing solutions

fluent and thorough communication of information and ideas in terms of the conventions of the discipline

frequent application of appropriate skills, techniques and methods with superior levels of precision and accuracy

most answers correct, few incorrect

Credit

C

65-74

For performance that provides evidence of a high level of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes, demonstrating the attributes of a pass grade plus (as applicable) one or more of the following:

evidence of learning that goes beyond replication of content knowledge or skills

demonstration of solid understanding of fundamental concepts in the field of study

demonstration of the ability to apply these concepts in a variety of contexts

use of convincing arguments with appropriate coherent and logical reasoning

clear communication of information and ideas in terms of the conventions of the discipline

regular application of appropriate skills, techniques and methods with high levels of precision and accuracy

many answers correct, some incorrect

Pass

P

50-64

For performance that provides evidence of a satisfactory level attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes, demonstrating (as applicable) one or more of the following:

knowledge, understanding and application of fundamental concepts of the field of study

use of routine arguments with acceptable reasoning

adequate communication of information and ideas in terms of the conventions of the discipline

ability to apply appropriate skills, techniques and methods with satisfactory levels of precision and accuracy

a combination of correct and incorrect answers

Fail

F

<50

For performance that does not provide sufficient evidence of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes.

Technical Fail

TF

When minimum performance level requirements for at least one assessment item in the subject as a whole has not been met despite the student achieving at least a satisfactory level of attainment of the subject learning outcomes.

Satisfactory

S

Awarded for performance that demonstrates a satisfactory level of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes.

Unsatisfactory

U

Awarded for performance that demonstrates an unsatisfactory level of attainment of the relevant subject learning outcomes.

SUBMISSION AND RETURN OF ASSESSMENTS

Procedures for the Submission and Return of Assessed Work
  • Written assignments should be word processed in 12 point font and double-spaced.
  • All hardcopy assignments should be submitted with a coversheet. Students are responsible for ensuring that the receipt (at the bottom of the coversheet) is signed and that they retain it until the assignment is returned. Electronic receipts must also be kept until the assignment mark is posted.
  • Copies of assignments made before submission should be retained by students.
  • Hard copy assignments should be submitted in tutorials to the tutor unless alternative arrangements are made by the Subject Coordinator.
  • Online/Electronic Submission – Special requirements for online submission and return of work will be provided by your lecturer or Subject Coordinator where relevant. A coversheet (using the appropriate template) must be submitted for all online work.
  • Unless directed otherwise, marked assignments will be available within 3 weeks of submission. The Subject Coordinator will advise students of the procedure for returning marked assignments.
  • Assignments will be retained for 21 days after distribution of mark or release of final grade. For further information refer to Code of Practice – Teaching and Assessment.

Assignment Cover Sheets

http://socialsciences.uow.edu.au/current-students/cover-sheets/index.html

Late Submission of Assessment Tasks and Penalties

Assessed work must be handed in by the date and time given. If an assessment is submitted late, it will be marked in the normal way, and a penalty will then be applied.

Late Submission Penalty

Late submissions will receive a penalty of 5% per day (or part thereof) of the total possible marks for the assessment task for up to ten (10) days after the due date and time for submission (including weekends, and public holidays), or, where an extension has been granted, for up to ten (10) days after the nominated extension deadline. For the purposes of this penalty a weekend (Saturday and Sunday) will be regarded as two days.

No marks will be awarded for work submitted:

  1. more than ten (10) days after the due date, or
  2. after the assessment has been returned to the students; whichever is applicable.

In such an instance, a mark of zero and a result of Fail for the task will be applied.

Note: Assessments must still be submitted to meet minimum performance requirements even though no mark is to be awarded.

Examples of penalties:

Assignment Value

Student Mark

Number of Days Late

Penalty (5% of

Total Possible

Mark)

Student Actual Mark

100

80

0

0

80

100

80

1

5

75

100

80

2

10

70

20

16

0

0

16

20

16

1

1

15

20

16

2

2

14

50

40

2

5

35

Extensions

Extensions of time to submit material for assessment can only be requested in advance of the due date for an assessment activity through the Academic Consideration process on SOLS. For more information please refer to the Student Academic Consideration Policy at: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058721.html

Note: This Subject Outline provides details of requirements for the subject and this information includes the dates for the submission of work for assessment. Pressure of work, either from employment or from other subjects, is not an acceptable reason for seeking an extension of time.

Turnitin

Assignments submitted to this subject may be requested in electronic format. An originality check through Turnitin or other text matching software may be undertaken for any submitted assignment.

Retention of Submitted Work

The University may retain copies of student work in order to facilitate quality assurance of assessment processes, in support of the continuous improvement of assessment design, assessment marking and for the review of the subject. The University retains records of students’ academic work in accordance with the University Records Management Policy and the State Records Act 1988 and uses these records in accordance with the University Privacy Policy and the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998.

GENERAL ASSESSMENT INFORMATION

Academic Consideration

If you believe that your submission of, performance in or attendance at an assessment activity, including an examination, has been affected on compassionate grounds, by illness or by other serious extenuating circumstances beyond your control, you can apply for academic consideration in Student OnLine Services (SOLS). Do not assume that an application for academic consideration will be automatically granted. For more information please refer to the Student Academic Consideration Policy at: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058721.html

In some circumstances you may be offered a deferred exam. For more information about Deferred and Supplementary

Exams refer to: http://www.uow.edu.au/student/exams/aboutsupp/index.html

Supplementary Assessment

Supplementary assessment may be offered to students whose performance in this subject is close to that required to pass the subject, and are otherwise identified as meriting an offer of a supplementary assessment. The Subject Coordinator will determine the precise form of supplementary assessment at the time the offer of a supplementary is made. In some circumstances you may be offered a supplementary exam. For more information about Supplementary Exams refer to: http://www.uow.edu.au/student/exams/aboutsupp/index.html

Scaling

Marks awarded for any assessment task (including examinations) may be subject to scaling at the end of the session by the School Assessment Committee (SAC) and/or the Faculty Assessment Committee (FAC). Marks may be scaled in accordance with University policy. Scaling will not affect any individual student’s rank order within their cohort. For more information refer to Standards for Finalisation of Student Results: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW039331.html

Student Academic Complaints Policy

In accordance with the Coursework Student Academic Complaints Policy, a student may request an explanation of a mark for an assessment task or a final grade for a subject consistent with the student’s right to appropriate and useful feedback on their performance in an assessment task. Refer to the Coursework Student Academic Complaints Policy (http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058653.html) for further information.

Assessment Quality Cycle

The University of Wollongong is committed to the quality assurance and quality enhancement of assessment. The University will meet its legislative and regulatory obligations, to ensure consistent and appropriate assessment through course management and coordination, including assessment quality assurance procedures. An Assessment Quality Cycle is used to describe quality assurance at the points of assessment design, assessment delivery, the declaration of marks and grades, and review and improvement activities.

Section C: General Advice for Students

STUDENT SUPPORT

Faculty Central / Student Hub

The Faculty Central or Student Hub is your first point of contact for a wide range of enquiries including:

  • Providing assistance with student forms.
  • Making an appointment with the Head of Students
  • Accepting some assignments where referred to in your Subject Outline.

Location

Student Service Centre

Building 23, Room G21

Student Hub 41

Building 41, Ground floor

Schools served

School of Education

School of Geography and Sustainable Communities

School of Health and Society

School of Psychology

Telephone

+61 2 4221 3981

+61 2 4221 5962

Email

ssc@uow.edu.au

Counter hours

9am – 5pm Monday to Friday

Student Support Adviser (SSA)

If you have a temporary or ongoing issue or a problem that is affecting your study, including issues that are related to belonging to an equity group, then the Student Support Advisers may be able to help. There are Student Support Advisers available to assist students who are studying at all UOW Campuses and in all UOW Faculties. Contact details can be found on the UOW website: https://www.uow.edu.au/student/services/SSA/contact/index.html

Library Services

To save yourself time and enhance your studies: connect with information specialists and resources anytime, anywhere via Ask Us: http://www.library.uow.edu.au/ask/UOW026599.html

Online – Ask a Librarian

Ask questions and receive a response within 1 business day

In person – Book a Librarian

30-minute appointment with an Librarian

Research Consultation Service

1 hour appointment with an information specialist.

Available to UOW academics, HDRs, Postgraduate Coursework, Honours and Masters students.

By phone

+61 2 4221 3548

The Main Library (Building 16) and Education Curriculum Resources Centre (Building 22) are located at the Wollongong Campus. UOW Libraries at other locations are listed on the Library website. http://www.library.uow.edu.au

21

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES

Teaching and Assessment: Code of Practice - Teaching

This Code is a key document in implementing the University’s Teaching and Assessment Policy and sets out the specific responsibilities of parties affected in relation to learning, teaching and assessment, as well as procedures for teaching staff. The Code can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058666.html

Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy

The purpose of this Policy is to set out the University of Wollongong’s approach to effective learning, teaching and assessment, including the principles and minimum standards underlying teaching and assessment practice. The Policy can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/alphalisting/UOW222905.html

Teaching and Assessment: Subject Delivery Policy

This Policy sets out specific requirements in relation to the delivery of Subjects. The policy can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/alphalisting/UOW222906.html

The Student Charter – Your Rights and Responsibilities

The Student Charter is shaped by the University’s mission to excel through providing world-class teaching, learning and research opportunities that challenge, inform and inspire its students in a diverse and inclusive environment. The Student Charter is based on principles that guide all members of the University and that promote responsible partnerships within and beyond the University community. It acknowledges the importance of the connection that is forged between students and staff of the University as well as the broader community. It encompasses a commitment to academic integrity and the five fundamental values on which this rests: honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.

http://www.uow.edu.au/student/charter/index.html

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism Policy

The University’s policy on acknowledgement practice and plagiarism provides detailed information about how to acknowledge the work of others:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058648.html

Student Academic Consideration Policy

The purpose of the Student Academic Consideration Policy is to enable student requests for academic consideration for specific assessment tasks, examinations, academic progress or attendance requirements in a subject relevant to their course to be evaluated in a fair, reasonable, timely and consistent manner throughout the University. This Policy sets out clear and defined requirements allowing for transparency, ease of interpretation and implementation. Consistency in criteria, procedures, and outcomes in the processing of applications for academic consideration for all forms of assessment are requirements of this Policy. The Policy can be found at: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058721.html

Course Progress Policy

The Course Progress Policy establishes the requirements, definitions and procedures to be used in determining the standards of acceptable course progress; the definitions of the roles and responsibilities of UOW staff and students with regard to course progress; and the descriptions of the resources and choices available to assist students at risk of not achieving course progress standards. The Policy can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058679.html

Coursework Student Academic Complaints Policy

UOW aims to provide a transparent and consistent process for resolving student academic grievances. Further information is available at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058653.html

Inclusive Language Guidelines

UOW endorses a policy of non-discriminatory language practice in all academic and administrative activities of the University. Further information is available from:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/alphalisting/UOW140611.html

Copyright Policy

The purpose of this Policy is to outline responsibilities and procedures regarding the use of third party copyright material, with the objectives of reducing staff and UOW exposure to the risks associated with the use of third party copyright material, assisting staff to make full legal use of the materials at their disposal by clearly identifying responsibilities and promoting copyright compliance. The Policy can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/alphalisting/UOW026670.html

Intellectual Property

UOW’s Intellectual Property Policy provides guidance on the approach taken to Intellectual Property (IP), including its ownership, protection and exploitation. Further information about the management of IP is available at http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058689.html

Student Conduct Rules

In line with UOW’s commitment to academic integrity, new rules related to student conduct have been in effect since 1 January 2008. Relevant information may be found at: http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058723.html

Code of Practice – Research

This Code mandates the current policy and best practice relating to procedures for responsible research. The Code can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058663.html

Code of Practice – Honours

This Code sets out the responsibilities of all parties involved in managing students undertaking Honours Programs. The Code can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058661.html

The Code of Practice – Student Professional Experience

The Code of Practice – Student Professional Experience sets out what is expected from students, the University and Host Organisations in providing student professional experience programs. It applies to student professional experience programs that form the whole or part of a subject or course offered at the University. The code assists in promoting a productive learning experience for students. Current policies and practices relating to the workplace experience and other practical training requirements can be found at:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058662.html

IP Student Assignment of Intellectual Property Policy

This policy applies to all Students (under-graduate and post-graduate) of the University of Wollongong (UOW). It may also apply to other persons by agreement. This policy sets out the approach taken by UOW in relation to Student assignment of intellectual property. Further information about this policy can be found here:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058690.html

Ethical Objection by Students to the Use of Animal and Animal Products in Coursework Subjects

The University of Wollongong is committed to recognition of the diversity of values held by students at the University and seeks to provide avenues for students to complete their chosen field of study without compromising their ethical commitments. The University, through its Animal Ethics Committee, has a responsibility to review any proposed research and teaching involving living animals in accordance with the NHMRC Australian Code of Practice for the Care and Use of Animals for Scientific Purposes (2004) and the Animal Research Act, 1985 (NSW).

This policy provides a framework for recognition of and responses to students' ethical or religious objection to animal use in coursework subjects at the University of Wollongong. For the purpose of this policy, animal use includes killing of animals in experimental work, dissection of animals that are already dead, use of animal tissues, use of animal-derived products (such as sera). These uses are relevant to teaching and assessment. Further information about this policy can be found here:

http://www.uow.edu.au/about/policy/UOW058708.html

Human Research Ethics Guidelines

The Human Research Ethics Committee protects the welfare and rights of the participants in research activities. Further information can be found here:

http://www.uow.edu.au/research/ethics/human/index.html

Workplace Health & Safety Policy

The Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) unit at UOW aims to provide structures, system and support to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all at the campus. Further information is available from: http://staff.uow.edu.au/ohs/

Topics in psychology

  • Social psychology
  • Abnormal psychology
  • Biological psychology
  • Cognitive psychology
  • Comparative psychology
  • Counseling psychology
  • Clinical psychology
  • Critical psychology
  • Developmental psychology
  • Educational psychology
  • Evolutionary psychology
  • Forensic psychology
  • Health psychology
  • Industrial/organizational psychology
  • Legal psychology
  • Personality psychology
  • Quantitative psychology