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SITHCCC019 Produce Cakes and Pastries and Bread Task 2 Project

Document Title: Task 2 Project

Document Subtitle: SITHCCC019 Produce cakes, pastries and breads

COMPETENCY DEMONSTRATION

This Assessment Task covers the following unit of competency:

Unit of competency:

Unit Code

SITHCCC019

Unit Title

Produce Cakes, Pastries and Breads

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to produce cakes, pastries and breads in a commercial kitchen following standard recipes. It requires the ability to select, prepare and portion ingredients; and to use relevant equipment a range of cookery methods to make and decorate cakes, pastries and breads, and food storage methods.

It does not cover the specialist skills used by patissiers to produce specialist patisserie products. These are covered in the range of patisserie units coded ‘PAT’.

The unit applies to hospitality and catering organisations that produce and serve cakes, pastries and breads, including hotels, restaurants and patisseries.

It applies to individuals who work under the guidance of more senior chefs. They demonstrate autonomy and judgement to complete routine activities and take limited responsibility in known and stable contexts within established parameters.

No occupational licensing, certification or specific legislative requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.

To demonstrate your competency in this unit you will need to provide evidence of your ability to:

§ Select ingredients

§ Select, prepare and use equipment.

§ Portion and prepare ingredients

§ Cook cakes, pastries, breads

§ Decorate, present and store cakes pastries and breads

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PROJECT

· Complete the readiness for assessment workbook before commencing this assessment

· You will be required to complete all parts within this task

· This assessment may consist of a number of tasks based on a simulated or real environment

· ensure all tasks are in line with your organisation relevant policies and procedures

· You may ask your assessor questions to clarify requirements of the tasks if required. However, your assessor will not be able to show you how to complete the task

· You must receive a satisfactory result for each part of this assessment to be successful in this task

· You must not separate this document. Attachments must be as per the assessment submission instructions

· Ensure you complete the task record sheet at the end of this assessment

· Return your assessment by the date set by your assessor and your training plan

· Do not plagiarise. Plagiarism is considered cheating. Please refer below for our policy in regards to cheating

· Reasonable adjustment: If you require any adjustments to accommodate a need in order to complete this assessment, please talk to your assessor. Arrangements will be put in place to ensure a fair and flexible approach is undertaken for this assessment. Please note that the range or nature of the adjustment will ensure that the outcomes of the unit are not compromised.

· Feedback: Your assessor will provide feedback to you after the completion of the assessment.

· The trainer assessor will explain the appeals process if applicable or alternatively refer to your student handbook for further details

ASSESSMENT TASK 2PROJECT BRIEF

Objective of the task

The purpose of this task is to demonstrate your knowledge on producing cakes, pastries and breads in a commercial kitchen following standard recipes. You must explain how to select, prepare and portion ingredients; and to use relevant equipment and a range of cookery methods to make and decorate cakes, pastries and breads, and food storage methods.

Resources

Learner Guide

PowerPoint Slides/Handouts

Computer

Internet

How to Guide Template

You will be required to complete

You must complete a ‘How to Guide’ on how to produces cakes, pastries and breads following standard recipes.

Time allocation

Refer to Training Plan

Your task

You are required to refer to the ‘How to Guide’ (Appendix 1).

Demonstrate your knowledge by conducting research to outline the points provided and complete a “How to Guide” Appendix 1.

Complete Section 1 – 16

Section 1: Culinary terms and trade names

1.1 Below is a list of common culinary terms for baking to help you with reading a recipe. Define each of the culinary terms listed below:

1.2 Describe the 9 essential ingredients used in cakes, pastries and bread

1.3 For the culinary terms and trade names located in the following 12 recipes used for cakes, pastries and breads outline the ingredients, cooking method, preparation style used. Record your response in the table provided at the end of each recipe.

1.3.1 For recipe #1 – Basic Sponge Cake

1.3.2 For recipe #2 – Chocolate Muffins

1.3.3 For recipe #3 – Strawberry Swiss Roll

1.3.4 For recipe #4 – Raspberry Friands

1.3.5 For recipe #5 – Quiche Lorraine

1.3.6 For recipe #6 – Caramel tarts with maple pecans

1.3.7 For recipe #7 – Apple Strudel

1.3.8 For recipe #8 – Easy Homemade Croissant

1.3.9 For recipe #9 – Paul’s French Baguettes

1.3.10 For recipe #10 – Plaited fruit bun with icing

1.3.11 For recipe #11 – White bread round rolls

1.3.12 For recipe #12 – Hot Cross Buns

Section 2: Contents of stock date codes and rotation labels

2.1 What information should be included on any food labelling / coding within a commercial kitchen?

2.2 What are rotation labels?

2.3 Describe the purpose of stock date codes

2.4 Explain when are stock date codes used? Provide 4 examples

Section 3: Food safety practices for handling and storing cakes, pastries and breads

3.1 Why is it important to maintain personal hygiene when working with food?

3.2 What is the Food Safety Act? What does this cover?

3.3 How does the Food Safety Act affect you in food processing?

3.4 Describe how unfrosted cakes, pastries, biscuits, muffins and loaves should be stored

Section 4: Classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and sweet and savoury breads

4.1 Name each of the following cakes, pastries and sweet and savoury breads

Section 5: Characteristics of a variety of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

5.1 Describe the following characteristics of each yeast based product listed below

5.2 Describe the following characteristics of each cake product listed below

5.3 Describe the following pastry structures

Section 6: Historical and cultural derivations of a variety of cakes, pastries and breads

6.1 Describe briefly the history of yeast

6.2 Provide a basic summary of how yeast based products became a staple of today's western diet.

6.3 Provide a brief overview of the history of pastry

6.4 Describe briefly the overall history of cakes

6.5 Describe the history of sponge cakes

Section 7: Basic aspects of yeast fermentation and dough development processes

7.1 What is ‘punching down’? Why is this done with dough?

7.2 What effect do different proofing methods have on the dough? List some proofing methods.

7.3 What effect does dough handling have?

7.4 List 4 factors which will have an impact on yeast fermentation time.

7.5 Why is it important to rest pastry before rolling or moulding it?

7.6 Describe the 6 steps to rolling dough

7.7 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast should be stored to optimise its shelf life

7.8 What is the standard bread dough temperature when mixing product? What happens if this is increased?

7.9 What effect does sugar have on yeast fermentation speed?

7.10 List 2 functions of wheat protein in yeast products

7.11 What is yeast? What does it do in dough?

7.12 How is dough produced?

7.13 What is dough development

Section 8: Nutritional value of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

8.1 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following yeast products (breads)

8.2 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following cakes

8.3 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following pastry products

Section 9: Indicators of freshness and quality of stocked ingredients for cakes, pastries and breads

9.1 How can you maximise shelf life of glazed pastry products?

9.2 What would you look for when assessing the quality of a Choux pastry product?

9.3 How long will cakes typically last if stored at room temperature? How can you maximise this time?

9.4 Should you store yeast products in the fridge or on the counter? Explain your answer.

9.5 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast should be stored to optimise its shelf life

9.6 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast products should be stored to optimise their shelf life

9.7 How should flour be stored? What is the typical shelf life of all-purpose flour?

Section 10: Cookery methods for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

10.1 Describe the following cookery methods for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

Section 11: Main types, culinary characteristics and uses of fillings for cakes, pastries or breads

11.1 For each filling type, answer the following questions (in the context of cake, pastry and bread recipes

Section 12: Main types, culinary characteristics and uses of decorations for cakes, pastries or breads

12.1 Describe 2 cakes, pastries or breads you would use the following decorations on

Section 13: Appropriate baking temperatures and cooking times for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

13.1 What temperature should pie dough be kept at during mixing and makeup? Explain why this is important

13.2 Some pastry recipes require an initial hotter temperature in the oven (e.g. 220 degrees Celsius) before reducing the temperature. Why is this?

13.3 What is the best temperature for baking puff dough products? Explain your answer

13.4 Should cakes containing high sugar be cooked at lower or high temperature than a pastry with low sugar content? Explain your answer

Section 14: Appropriate environmental conditions for storing cakes, pastries, breads and re-usable by-products of their preparation to ensure food safety and optimise shelf life

14.1 Identify 6 environmental conditions you should take into consideration for storing cakes, pastries, breads and re-usable by-products of their preparation to ensure food safety and optimise shelf life

14.2 The most important tip for successfully storing all baked goods is to let them cool completely.

Explain what can happen if baked goods are not cooled before being stored?

14.3 Outline 5 steps to storing bread in appropriate environmental conditions that will ensure food safety and optimise shelf life

Section 15: Mise en place requirements for producing cakes, pastries and breads and fillings

15.1 What does mise en place mean?

15.2 List 5 steps to utilising mise en place principles in baking

Section 16: Safe operational practices using essential functions and features of equipment used to produce cakes, pastries and breads.

16.1 List 4 safety measures when operating a commercial mixer

16.2 List 2 standard safety features on a commercial mixer

16.3 List 3 attachments for vertical mixers, and what each is used for.

APPENDIX 1 – How to Guide

How to Produce Cakes, Pastries and Breads

Name:

Section 1: Culinary terms and trade names

You are to provide information on culinary terms and trade names for ingredients commonly used in the production of different poultry dishes for the following variety of classical and contemporary poultry dishes including the different cuts of poultry and styles of cooking.

1.1 Below is a list of common culinary terms for baking to help you with reading a recipe. Define each of the culinary terms listed below:

Baking blind

Beating

Creaming

Curdling

Dusting/Dredging

Folding in

Icing

1.2 Describe the 9 essential ingredients used in cakes, pastries and bread

Flour

Leaveners

Sugar

Salt

Dairy

Fats: Oil and Shortening

Extracts and Flavourings

Spices

Add-Ins

1.3 For the culinary terms and trade names located in the following 12 recipes used for cakes, pastries and breads outline the ingredients, cooking method, preparation style used. Record your response in the table provided at the end of each recipe.

1.3.1 For recipe #1 –Basic Sponge Cake

Ingredients:

1/3 cup (50g) plain flour

1/3 cup (50g) self-raising flour

1/3 cup (50g) cornflour

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 x 60g eggs, at room temperature

2/3 cup (150g) caster sugar

Whipped cream, for filling

Fresh fruit, for filling

Icing sugar, for dusting

Preparation and cooking steps:

1. Grease 2 x deep, 20cm round cake tins (or different tins, as directed in individual recipes) and line bases with baking paper. Sift flours and 1/4 teaspoon salt together three times to aerate.

2. Preheat oven to 180C. Using an electric mixer, beat eggs and sugar in a large bowl on medium-high speed for 6 minutes, or until mixture is thick, pale and tripled in volume.

3. Gradually sift flour mixture over egg mixture while simultaneously folding in with a large metal spoon until just combined. Divide mixture between prepared tins. To level batter, gently spin tins on kitchen counter. Bake for 20 minutes (or as directed in individual recipes), or until cakes have shrunk away from the sides slightly and spring back when gently touched.

4. Turn out on to baking paper-lined wire racks. Carefully peel away baking paper, then leave to cool.

Plating:

Fill with whipped cream and your choice of fresh fruit. Dust with icing sugar.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Basic Sponge Cake

1.3.2 For recipe #2 – Chocolate Muffins

Ingredients:

1 3/4 cups plain flour

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup cocoa powder

2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

2 egg lightly beaten large

1 cup milk

1/2 cup butter melted

1/2 cup chocolate chips optional

1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda

Preparation and cooking steps:

1. Preheat oven to 180C. Grease a muffin pan.

2. Combine flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a bowl.

3. Add in eggs, milk and melted butter. Stir until combined.

4. Add chocolate chips and mix.

5. Spoon into prepared pan. Bake for 18-20 minutes.

6. Transfer onto a wire rack to cool.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Chocolate Muffins

1.3.3 For recipe #3 – Strawberry Swiss Roll

Ingredients:

Cake

3/4 cup(95g) all-purpose flour

1 tsp(4g) baking powder

1/2 tsp(2g) salt

4eggs

3/4 cup(150g) sugar

1 tsp(5g) vanilla extract

2 tbsp(28g) canola oil

Fresh strawberries for serving

Powdered sugar for dusting

Strawberry Jam Filling

10 oz(300g) strawberries, cut into smaller pieces

1/4 cup(50g) sugar

1 tbsp(15ml) water

Cream Cheese Filling

9 oz(250g) cream cheese, room temperature

1 cup(240g) whipping cream, chilled

1/2 cup(60g) powdered sugar

1 tsp(5g) vanilla extract

Method:

Prepare the strawberry jam filling:

1. In a small saucepan put the strawberries, sugar and water. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Press the strawberries with the back of the spoon to speed up the process. Simmer until the mixture is thick, for about 15-20 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool completely before using.

Prepare the cake:

2. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). Butter a 12X16 inch (30x40 cm) baking tray and line it with parchment paper.

3. In a medium bowl whisk flour with baking powder and salt. Set aside.

4. In a large bowl add eggs, sugar and vanilla extract. Beat with an electric mixer until lemon yellow and foamy. Add oil and mix until well incorporated. Gradually add flour mixture.

5. Pour the batter into the prepared baking tray and spread evenly into the corners using the back of the spatula.

6. Bake for 12-15 minutes until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

7. Take a kitchen towel and generously sprinkle with powdered sugar. This helps the cake not stick to the towel. Flip the cake over the towel. Remove the parchment paper and dust with powdered sugar.

8. While still hot roll the cake up in the towel. You will have to do it while is still hot/warm otherwise it cracks. Let cool completely.

Prepare the cream cheese filling:

9. In a bowl, beat cream cheese with powdered sugar and vanilla. In another bowl whip the cream with an electric mixer until it forms stiff peaks. Fold together.

10. Unroll the cake and spread the strawberry filling evenly over the cake.

11. Spread the cream cheese filling on top of the strawberry filling.

12. Roll the cake back up. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving.

Plating: Sprinkle with more powdered sugar before serving and decorate with fresh strawberries

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Strawberry Swiss Roll

1.3.4 For recipe #4 – Raspberry Friands

Ingredients:

160g (1 ½ stick) unsalted butter

100g (⅔ cup)plain flour

250g (1 ⅔ cup)icing sugar(powdered sugar)

125g (1 cup)ground almonds

6eggwhites

1 teaspoonvanilla extract

small punnet of raspberries

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to180°C

2. Melt the butter in a small saucepan until it turns a pale golden colour, but be careful not to let it burn.

3. Use some of the butter to lightly grease the friand moulds.

4. Let the butter cool slightly to use later in the recipe.

5. Sift the flour and icing sugar into a large bowl and stir through the ground almonds.

6. Place the eggwhites into another large bowl and whisk until they are white and frothy.

7. Gently mix the frothy eggwhites into the flour mixture.

8. Add the melted butter and vanilla extract, and stir everything together.

9. Fill the friand tin until each mould is⅔ full. Using anice-cream scoopwill help you to divide the batter evenly and to make even-sized friands.

10. Place2 to 3 raspberriesinto each mould.

11. Bake the friands in the oven for about20-25 minutes, or until they are lightly golden and a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean.

12. Let the friands cool in the pan for about 5 minutes before removing them to a wire rack to cool completely.

Plating:

Serve the friands warm or cold with a dusting of icing sugar.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Raspberry Friands

1.3.5 For recipe #5 –Quiche Lorraine

Ingredients:

Quiche Crust

1 1/4 cups (185g) plain white flour(all-purpose flour)

1/2tspsalt

100g / 7 tbspunsalted butter, cold, cut into 1cm/ 1/3" cubes

3tbspice cold water (+ more as required)

Quiche Lorraine Filling

BACON FILLING:

1 tbsp / 15gbutter

1garlic clove, minced

1/2onion, finely chopped(~1/2 cup)

200 g bacon, cut into small strips (1.5 x 0.5cm / 2/3" x 1/5")

EGG MIXTURE

4eggs (~55- 65g)

1 1/4 cups (300ml)heavy cream (thickened cream) (Note 1)

Pinchof salt & pepper

CHEESE:

1 1/4 cups (125g)grated gruyere cheese (or tasty, cheddar)

GARNISH:

50g bacon, chopped and cooked until golden

Method:

Quiche Crust

1. Place flour, salt and butter in a food processor.

2. Pulse 10 times or until it looks like breadcrumbs.

3. With the motor running on low, pour 2.5 tbsp of water into the tube feeder.

4. Turn up to high and blitz for 30 seconds or until it turns into a ball of dough. Initially it will look like breadcrumbs, then it will turn into a ball of soft dough - some random escaped bits is fine. If it doesn't look like its coming together at 20 seconds, add another 1/2 tbsp of water. Don't blitz longer than 30 seconds at most.

5. Form a disc, wrap in cling wrap. If there are escaped crumble bits, that's fine - just press them in. Refrigerate for 1 hour.

6. Preheat oven to 200C/390F (standard) or 180C/350F (fan forced)

7. Sprinkle work surface with flour, unwrap dough and place on the flour. Sprinkle top with flour, then roll out into a 27cm/11" round.

8. Gently roll the pastry so it wraps around the rolling pin.

9. Unroll it over the quiche pan - 23cm / 9".

10. Press the pastry into the edges of the quiche pan, patching up edges if required (if pastry doesn't quite reach top of rim).

11. Roll the rolling pin across the top to cut off the excess pastry.

12. Optional extra "safe measure" refrigeration - 15 minutes. See (Note 2).

13. Place a large piece of parchment paper over the pastry, then fill with baking beads or lots of rice or dried beans to weigh it down. (Note 3)

14. Bake for 20 minutes, then remove from oven.

15. Turn oven DOWN to 180C/350F (or 160C/320F fan).

16. Use excess paper to CAREFULLY remove hot beads, then return to oven for 10 minutes or until base is light golden.

17. Remove from oven and fill with quiche Lorraine filling

Quiche Lorraine Filling

BACON FILLING:

1. Preheat oven to 200C/390F (standard) or 180C/350F (fan / convection).

2. Melt butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Add onion, garlic and bacon. Cook until bacon is light golden.

3. Transfer to a paper towel lined bowl and leave to cool.

EGG MIXTURE:

4. Place ingredients in a bowl and whisk to combine.

ASSEMBLING AND BAKING:

5. Place quiche tin with cooked quiche crust on tray. Scatter cooled Bacon Filling evenly across base of cooked quiche crust.

6. Scatter cheese evenly across top.

7. Carefully pour Egg mixture over the top. Push some of the cheese/bacon below the surface.

8. Bake for 35 - 40 minutes until the top is golden. The centre should still be jiggly.

Plating:

Garnish with Extra Bacon. Rest for 10 minutes before removing from the pan to cut and serve.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Quiche Lorraine

1.3.6 For recipe #6 –Caramel tarts with maple pecans

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups plain flour

2 tablespoons caster sugar

125g butter, chilled, chopped

1 egg yolk

2 tablespoons chilled water

CARAMEL FILLING

3/4 cup caster sugar

2/3 cup thickened cream

80g butter, chopped

MAPLE PECANS

3/4 cup pecans

1 tablespoon maple syrup

Method:

1. Place flour, sugar and butter in a processor. Process until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Add egg yolk and 1 tablespoon chilled water. Process until dough just comes together, adding more chilled water if necessary. Turn out on to a lightly floured surface. Knead until just smooth. Shape into a disc. Cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, make maple pecans: Preheat oven to 200°C/180°C fan-forced. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Place pecans and syrup in a bowl. Toss to coat. Place mixture, in a single layer, on prepared tray. Bake, stirring occasionally, for 10 to 12 minutes or until golden and crisp.

3. Reduce oven temperature to 180°C/ 160°C fan-forced. Grease four 3cm-deep, 10cm (base) loose-based fluted tart pans. Roll out pastry between 2 sheets of baking paper until 5mm thick. Using a 13cm round cutter, cut 4 rounds from pastry. Line pans with pastry. Refrigerate for 10 minutes

4. Place pans on a baking tray. Line pastry cases with baking paper. Fill with ceramic pie weights or uncooked rice. Bake for 12 to 14 minutes or until edges are light golden. Remove weights or rice and paper. Bake for 8 minutes or until bases are light golden. Set aside to cool.

5. Make caramel filling: Place sugar in a frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook, without stirring, for 5 to 6 minutes or until sugar turns golden. Reduce heat to low. Add cream. Cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes or until smooth. Remove from heat. Add butter. Stir to combine. Cool for 5 minutes. Pour into pastry cases. Refrigerate overnight or until set.

Plating:

Top with maple pecans. Serve.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Caramel tarts with maple pecans

1.3.7 For recipe #7 – Apple Strudel

Ingredients:

250g flour 00 (or unbleached all-purpose)

50g unsalted butter at room temperature

1egg, organic, free-range

5 Tbsplukewarm water

pinch of salt

4organic apples, about 700-800 g (I used a mix of Gala and Honey Crisp)

50g raisins

3 Tbsprum

100g coconut sugar (or raw cane sugar)

1 tspcinnamon

50g pine nuts

a handful of walnuts, chopped

5 Tbspapricot jam (or any other jam you have)

5 Tbspbreadcrumbs

40g butter

Method:

1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, add the flour, the pinch of salt, the soft butter and the egg. Mix at low speed, then add the water 1 Tbsp at a time. Keep working on low speed until you reach a smooth, soft dough. Cover the dough with a bowl or wrap it in plastic and let rest at room temperature for half an hour.

2. Heat the butter in a pan until foaming and add the breadcrumbs. Toast them, stirring constantly, until they are medium brown. Let cool.

3. Soak the raisins in the rum for at least 30 minutes.

4. Peel, core and thinly slice the apples. Add the coconut (or raw cane) sugar, and cinnamon, then add the raisins drained from the rum. Mix well.

5. Roll out the dough in between twolightly floured parchment paper sheetsthe thinnest possible to a rectangleabout 50×30 cm (13×9 inches). You could also roll the dough ontoa clean, lightly floured kitchen towel (it requires a greater skill).

6. Stretch it thin, possibly until you can see through. Thick edges can be cut off. Brush dough edges with melted butter.

7. Spread the toasted breadcrumbs over the dough (not the edges). Add dollops of apricot jam (or your jam of choice). Drain the apple mix and spread it over the breadcrumbs. Sprinkle the pine nuts and the walnuts.

8. With the help of the parchment, fold in the edges of the dough over the filling to prevent the filling from oozing while rolling.Then gently roll in the strudel starting from the long side and close it to a roll so that the seam is down.

9. Place it on its parchment onto a baking sheet, keeping it seam-side down. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with vanilla (or cane) sugar.

10. Bake the strudel at 180° C for 30-40 minutes. The strudel is ready when the crust turns a light golden.

Plating:

Cut into even slices for plating and dust with icing sugar

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Apple Strudel

1.3.8 For recipe #8 –Easy Homemade Croissant

Ingredients:

4cupsall-purpose flour

1/3cupgranulated sugar

4teaspoonsactive dry yeast

2 1/4teaspoonskosher salt

1 1/4cupsunsalted butter,cold (2 1/2 sticks)

1cupmilk(you may need as much as 1 1/4 cups)

egg wash(1 large egg beaten with a teaspoon or two of water)

Icing sugar to dust

Method:

1. Place the flour, sugar, yeast, and salt in a large bowl and whisk together until combined.

2. Slice the butter into 1/8-inch thick slices and toss in the flour mixture to coat.

3. Add the milk and stir together until a stiff dough forms.

4. Wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.

5. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough into a long rectangle shape.

6. Fold it into thirds (like a letter), turn 90 degrees, and repeat 4 to 6 more times, or until the dough has large streaks of butter in it but it is smooth and flat. (If at any point the butter starts to feel soft, chill it in the refrigerator or freezer until stiff.)

7. Wrap tightly and chill for 1 more hour, then divide the dough in half and roll each portion out to a thickness of about 1/8-inch, in a long rectangle shape (approx. 10-inches wide by 22-inches long).

8. Cut the dough into long, skinny triangles (about 5-inches at the wide end).

9. Notch the wide end of each triangle with about a 1/2-inch cut, then roll from the wide end to the pointed end, tucking the point under the croissant.

10. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and allow to proof for 2 hours.

11. Preheat the oven to 190˚C, and gently brush the croissants with egg wash.

12. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until puffed, golden brown, and flaky.

Plating:

Serve croissants on appropriate size plate and dust with icing sugar to serve

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Easy Homemade Croissant

1.3.9 For recipe #9 –Paul’s French Baguettes

Ingredients:

1kg plain flour (see tip), plus extra

600ml water (room temperature)

20g sea salt

1 packet (7g) baker’s yeast

Warm butter and pulled roast chicken, to serve

Method:

1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and work together with your hands or a wooden spoon. It will seem very wet at first, then very dry, but in the end it will form a very moist, sticky dough.

2. Knead dough well for 2-3 minutes, then transfer to a bowl to rise, about 1-1.5 hours. When dough is doubled in size, transfer to a clean surface. Dough should still be very sticky. Dust with a little flour, being careful not to add so much to change the texture of the dough.

3. Preheat oven to 250C (or as high as oven will go). Line a large baking tray (that will fit four baguettes, or two smaller trays that will fit two baguettes each) with baking paper and dust with a little flour. Place a large casserole or oven-proof dish half filled with water in the bottom of the oven.

4. Divide dough into four pieces, roughly the same size. Take one portion and gently roll it into a baguette shape – checking it will fit your oven and baking tray. Repeat with remaining four pieces of dough. Cover with four-dusted plastic wrap and let rise until doubled in size, about 1-1.5 hours.

5. Use a very sharp knife, razor or scissors to cut 4-5 slashes in each baguette. Use a spray bottle filled with water to lightly spray the baguettes all over. Place baguettes in oven and cook about 15 minutes, until baguettes are well-browned. Reduce oven temperature to 200C and cook another 5-10 minutes

6. Transfer baguettes to a cooling rack and leave until completely cool before slicing.

Plating:

Slice baguettes and serve with warm butter and pulled roast chicken

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Paul’s French Baguettes

1.3.10 For recipe #10 –Plaited fruit bun with icing

Ingredients:

3/4 cup (185ml) warm milk

2 teaspoons (7g/1 sachet) dried yeast

1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar

2 1/2 cups (375g) plain flour

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon rind

1 egg, lightly whisked

20g butter, melted

1/2 cup (90g) sultanas

1/2 cup (80g) currants

1/3 cup (65g) mixed peel

1 egg yolk

2 tablespoons milk

Butter, to serve

ICING

1 cup (150g) pure icing sugar

2 teaspoons cold water

2 teaspoons lemon juice

Method:

1. Combine milk, yeast and 1 tablespoon of the sugar in a small bowl. Set aside for 5 minutes or until frothy.

2. Combine flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon rind and remaining sugar in a bowl. Add milk mixture, egg and butter; stir to combine. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; knead for 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Place in a bowl; cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place, for 1 hour or until doubled in size.

3. Preheat oven to 200°C. Lightly grease an oven tray. Add the sultanas, currants and mixed peel to the dough. Knead until smooth. Divide dough into 3 even portions. Roll each portion into 40cm-long logs. Place logs on the tray and plait. Combine egg yolk and milk in a bowl. Brush evenly over the bun. Set aside for 10 minutes to rise. Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 180°C and bake for a further 20 minutes or until golden and loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Set aside to cool.

4. Combine the icing sugar, water and lemon juice in a medium bowl to form a smooth paste. Place in a small plastic bag. Snip off the end and drizzle over the bun.

Plating:

Cut into slices and serve with butter.

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Plaited fruit bun with icing

1.3.11 For recipe #11 –White bread round rolls

Ingredients:

3 cups (450g) strong plain flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

40g butter

1 cup (250ml) warm milk

1 tablespoon (14g/2 sachets) dried yeast

2 teaspoons caster sugar

Plain flour, to dust

Method:

1. Combine flour and salt in a bowl. Add butter; use fingertips to rub butter into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.

2. Combine milk, yeast and sugar in a jug; set aside for 5 minutes or until frothy. Add to flour mixture; stir to combine. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 10-15 minutes or until smooth and elastic.

3. Brush a large bowl with oil. Place dough in bowl and cover with a damp tea towel. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 1 hour or until dough doubles in size.

4. Preheat oven to 200°C. Punch centre of dough. Turn onto lightly floured surface; knead for 2 minutes or until smooth. Divide dough into eight even portions. Roll each portion into a ball. Place on lightly floured oven tray. Set aside for 10 minutes to rise.

5. Lightly brush rolls with a little water and dust with extra flour. Bake for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to 180°C; bake for a further 15-20 minutes or until rolls are golden brown and sound hollow when tapped on base.

Plating:

Serve warm or at room temperature with butter

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

White bread round rolls

1.3.12 For recipe #12 –Hot Cross Buns

Ingredients:

4cups plain flour

2 x 7g sachets dried yeast

1/4 cup caster sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons mixed spice

pinch of salt

1 1/2 cups currants

40g butter

300ml milk

2 eggs, lightly beaten

FLOUR PASTE

1/2 cup plain flour

4 to 5 tablespoons water

GLAZE

1/3 cup water

2 tablespoons caster sugar

Butter, to serve

Method:

1. Combine flour, yeast, sugar, mixed spice, salt and currants in a large bowl. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add milk. Heat for 1 minute, or until lukewarm. Add warm milk mixture and eggs to currant mixture. Use a flat-bladed knife to mix until dough almost comes together. Use clean hands to finish mixing to form a soft dough.

2. Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Knead for 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth. Place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, or until dough doubles in size.

3. Line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Punch dough down to its original size. Knead for 30 seconds on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Divide into 12 even portions. Shape each portion into a ball. Place balls onto lined tray, about 1cm apart. Cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 30 minutes, or until buns double in size. Preheat oven to 190°C or 170˚C fan-force.

4. Make flour paste: Mix flour and water together in a small bowl until smooth, adding a little more water if paste is too thick. Spoon into a small snap-lock bag. Snip off 1 corner of bag. Pipe flour paste over tops of buns to form crosses. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until buns are cooked through.

5. Make glaze: Place water and sugar into a small saucepan over low heat. Stir until sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil. Boil for 3-4 minutes. Brush warm glaze over warm hot cross buns.

Plating:Serve warm or at room temperature with butter

Name of the dish

Ingredients commonly used in the production of different cakes, pastries and breads

Different type of cake, pastry or bread and decorations type

Type of cake, pastry or bread

Decorations used

Hot Cross Buns

Section 2: Contents of stock date codes and rotation labels

2.1 What information should be included on any food labelling / coding within a commercial kitchen?

2.2 What are rotation labels?

2.3 Describe the purpose of stock date codes

2.4 Explain when are stock date codes used? Provide 4 examples

Section 3: Food safety practices for handling and storing cakes, pastries and breads

3.1 Why is it important to maintain personal hygiene when working with food?

3.2 What is the Food Safety Act? What does this cover?

3.3 How does the Food Safety Act affect you in food processing?

3.4 Describe how unfrosted cakes, pastries, biscuits, muffins and loaves should be stored

Section 4: Classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and sweet and savoury breads

4.1 Name each of the following cakes, pastries and sweet and savoury breads

Section 5: Characteristics of a variety of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

5.1 Describe the following characteristics of each yeast based product listed below

Croissants

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Sourdough Bread

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Hot Cross Bun

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Savarin

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

5.2 Describe the following characteristics of each cake product listed below

Genoise Sponge Cake

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Fruit cake

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Swiss roll

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Sponge

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Angels cake

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

5.3 Describe the following pastry structures

Filo

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Puff

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Shortcrust

Appearance

Colour

Consistency

Moisturecontent

Shape

Taste

Texture

Section 6: Historical and cultural derivations of a variety of cakes, pastries and breads

6.1 Describe briefly the history of yeast

6.2 Provide a basic summary of how yeast based products became a staple of today's western diet.

6.3 Provide a brief overview of the history of pastry

6.4 Describe briefly the overall history of cakes

6.5 Describe the history of sponge cakes

Section 7: Basic aspects of yeast fermentation and dough development processes

7.1 What is ‘punching down’? Why is this done with dough?

7.2 What effect do different proofing methods have on the dough? List some proofing methods.

7.3 What effect does dough handling have?

7.4 List 4 factors which will have an impact on yeast fermentation time.

7.5 Why is it important to rest pastry before rolling or moulding it?

7.6 Describe the 6 steps to rolling dough

7.7 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast should be stored to optimise its shelf life

7.8 What is the standard bread dough temperature when mixing product? What happens if this is increased?

7.9 What effect does sugar have on yeast fermentation speed?

7.10 List 2 functions of wheat protein in yeast products

7.11 What is yeast? What does it do in dough?

7.12 How is dough produced?

7.13 What is dough development

Section 8: Nutritional value of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

8.1 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following yeast products (breads)

White bread

Wholemeal Bread

Rye bread

Croissants

Danish pastry

8.2 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following cakes

Sponge Cake

Chocolate Mud Cake

Swiss Roll

Fruit Cake

8.3 Describe the nutritional value for each of the following pastry products

Puff pastry

Filo pastry

Choux pastry

Danish pastry

Section 9: Indicators of freshness and quality of stocked ingredients for cakes, pastries and breads

9.1 How can you maximise shelf life of glazed pastry products?

9.2 What would you look for when assessing the quality of a Choux pastry product?

9.3 How long will cakes typically last if stored at room temperature? How can you maximise this time?

9.4 Should you store yeast products in the fridge or on the counter? Explain your answer.

9.5 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast should be stored to optimise its shelf life

9.6 Describe the optimum conditions that yeast products should be stored to optimise their shelf life

9.7 How should flour be stored? What is the typical shelf life of all-purpose flour?

Section 10: Cookery methods for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

10.1 Describe the following cookery methods for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

adding fats and liquids to dry ingredients

chilling ingredients and work surfaces

cutting, shaping and moulding

kneading and handling

preparing and using pastry and dessert fillings

preparing and using pre-bake finishes and decorations

resting

rolling

Selecting and preparing appropriate cake tins and moulds

Describe what product the following tins / moulds are used for when cooking cakes, pastries and breads:

stirring and aerating to achieve required consistency and texture

using required amount of batter according to desired characteristics of finished products

weighing or measuring and sifting dry ingredients

whisking, folding, piping and spreading

Section 11: Main types, culinary characteristics and uses of fillings for cakes, pastries or breads

11.1 For each filling type, answer the following questions (in the context of cake, pastry and bread recipes

Bacon

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Cheese

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Fish

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Chocolate

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Poultry

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Meringue

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Nuts (whole or crushed)

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Vegetables

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Cream

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Ham

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Meat

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Custard

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

fresh or crystallised fruit and fruit purées

Savoury or sweet

Characteristics

2 recipes appropriate to use as a filling

Section 12: Main types, culinary characteristics and uses of decorations for cakes, pastries or breads

12.1 Describe 2 cakes, pastries or breads you would use the following decorations on

chocolate

coloured and flavoured sugar

fresh, preserved or crystallised fruits

fruit purées

glazes

icings

jellies

sprinkled icing sugar

whole or crushed nuts

Section 13: Appropriate baking temperatures and cooking times for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

13.1 What temperature should pie dough be kept at during mixing and makeup? Explain why this is important

13.2 Some pastry recipes require an initial hotter temperature in the oven (e.g. 220 degrees Celsius) before reducing the temperature. Why is this?

13.3 What is the best temperature for baking puff dough products? Explain your answer

13.4 Should cakes containing high sugar be cooked at lower or high temperature than a pastry with low sugar content? Explain your answer

Section 14: Appropriate environmental conditions for storing cakes, pastries, breads and re-usable by-products of their preparation toensure food safety and optimise shelf life

14.1 Identify 6 environmental conditions you should take into consideration for storing cakes, pastries, breads and re-usable by-products of their preparation to ensure food safety and optimise shelf life

14.2 The most important tip for successfully storing all baked goods is to let them cool completely.

Explain what can happen if baked goods are not cooled before being stored?

14.3 Outline 5 steps to storing bread in appropriate environmental conditions that will ensure food safety and optimise shelf life

Section 15: Mise en place requirements for producing cakes, pastries and breads and fillings

15.1 What does mise en place mean?

15.2 List 5 steps to utilising mise en place principles in baking

Section 16: Safe operational practices using essential functions and features of equipment used to produce cakes, pastries and breads.

16.1 List 4 safety measures when operating a commercial mixer

16.2 List 2 standard safety features on a commercial mixer

16.3 List 3 attachments for vertical mixers, and what each is used for.

ASSESSMENT OF REQUIRED OVERALL SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE FOR THIS TASK

Assessor to complete

ASSESSORS NOTE: Before making a final judgement on this assessment task, you must determine if the student is able to satisfactorily apply and perform the following criteria. This checklist is a guide to satisfactory performance of this task. The criteria below are directly linked to the performance measures required throughout the task and therefore there are no model answers required as the criterion below is underpinned by this assessment task. All criterion listed must be satisfactory to achieve a satisfactory outcome for this task. If a NS is provided for any of the criterion below then the task outcome should be treated as NS and the reassessment process should be applied.

IF a NS (not satisfactory) outcome is applied then you must inform the student in detail as to “why” this outcome was provided. Record your reasons in the section labelled “NS outcomes”

Task requirements - In your professional opinion has the student demonstrated the required skills when performing the routine task above related to this unit of competency. Is the student able to?

Item

Knowledge Evidence – Task requirements

In your professional opinion has the student performed the required knowledge when explaining routine tasks related to this unit of competency?Is the student able to:

S

NS

1

culinary terms and trade names for:

ingredients commonly used to produce cakes, pastries and breads

a variety of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

2

contents of stock date codes and rotation labels

3

food safety practices for handling and storing cakes, pastries and breads

4

classical and contemporary:

cakes:

basic aerated sponge

cold set cake and mousse cake

friands

fruit cake

Genoise sponge

Madeira cake

meringues

muffins

Swiss roll

pastries:

choux pastry

croissant

Danish pastry

puff pastry

short crust

sweet pastry

strudel

sweet and savoury breads:

baguette

bath or fruit bun

bread rolls

hot cross buns

unleavened breads

5

characteristics of a variety of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads:

appearance

colour

consistency

moisture content

shape

taste

texture

6

historical and cultural derivations of a variety of cakes, pastries and breads

7

basic aspects of yeast fermentation and dough development processes

8

nutritional value of classical and contemporary cakes, pastries and breads

9

indicators of freshness and quality of stocked ingredients for cakes, pastries and breads

10

cookery methods for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings:

adding fats and liquids to dry ingredients

chilling ingredients and work surfaces

cutting, shaping and moulding

kneading and handling

preparing and using fillings

preparing and using pre-bake finishes and decorations

resting

rolling

selecting and preparing appropriate cake tins and moulds

stirring and aerating to achieve required consistency and texture

using required amount of batter according to desired characteristics of finished products

weighing or measuring and sifting dry ingredients

whisking, folding, piping and spreading

11

main types, culinary characteristics and uses of fillings for cakes, pastries or breads:

savoury:

bacon

cheese

fish

ham

meat

poultry

vegetable

sweet:

chocolate

cream

custard

fresh or crystallised fruit and fruit purées

meringue

whole or crushed nuts.

12

main types, culinary characteristics and uses of decorations for cakes, pastries or breads:

chocolate

coloured and flavoured sugar

fresh, preserved or crystallised fruits

fruit purées

glazes

icings

jellies

sprinkled icing sugar

whole or crushed nuts

13

appropriate baking temperatures and cooking times for cakes, pastries, breads and fillings

14

appropriate environmental conditions for storing cakes, pastries, breads and re-usable by-products of their preparation to:

ensure food safety

optimise shelf life

15

mise en place requirements for producing cakes, pastries and breads and fillings

16

safe operational practices using essential functions and features of equipment used to produce cakes, pastries and breads.

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