Securing Higher Grades Costing Your Pocket? Book Your Coursework Help at The Lowest Price Now!

  • +1-617-874-1011 (US)
  • +44-117-230-1145 (UK)
Online Customer Service

SITXHRM006 Monitor Staff Performance Assessment 2

What will be assessed

The purpose of this assessment is to assess your underpinning knowledge to complete the tasks outlined in the elements and performance criteria for this unit of competency and relating to the following aspects:

• role and importance of monitoring staff performance and providing feedback and coaching

• key elements of performance standards and performance management systems:

o methods of collecting performance data

o methods of interpreting performance data

o processes for performance appraisal interviews

o type of assessment:

▪ self

▪ peer

▪ team

o productivity indicators

• forms of guidance and support to enhance staff performance:

o advice on training and development opportunities

o confirmation of organisational objectives and key performance requirements

o ensuring adequate resources are applied

o opportunity to discuss work challenges

o providing confirmation and corrective feedback

o representing staff interests in other forums

o support with difficult interpersonal situations

• potential solutions to staff performance issues:

o additional training

o adjusting workload

o agreeing on short-term goals for improvement

o assisting with problems outside of the workplace

o reorganising work practices

• performance appraisal practices:

o reasons for performance appraisal

o format for, and inclusions of, performance appraisal documents

o methods of appraising performance

• specific organisation:

o procedures for performance appraisal interviews

o procedures for formal performance management and counselling sessions:

▪ formal notification to staff member and management

▪ invited participation of appropriate people

▪ organisation of appropriate location for counselling session

o grievance procedures.

Place/Location where assessment will be conducted

SSH to complete

Resource Requirements

Pen, Paper or computer.

Instructions for assessment including WHS requirements

Assessment 2 consists of a Project including 2 Parts, Part A and Part B.

Part A

–  requires you to choose 3 different job roles relevant to your industry or area of training, for example Hospitality, Tourism or Events and develop the documentation for a performance appraisal procedure for these 3 positions.

Part B

requires you to write a report in which you will outline how you will administer the performance appraisal, the provisions for various feedback requirements, processes to recognise and deal with performance problems including training, and informal and formal grievance procedures

You are required to address all questions to achieve competence. Your trainer will provide you with instructions for time frames and dates to complete this assessment.

Once completed, carefully read the responses you have provided and check for completeness. Your trainer will provide you with feedback and the result you have achieved.

Assessment 2

Your task: Answer the following questions. Each question must be completed.

Part A

– requires you to choose 3 different job roles relevant to your industry or area of training, for example Hospitality, Tourism or Events and develop the documentation for a performance appraisal procedure for these 3 positions.

Part B

– requires you to write a report in which you will outline how you will administer the performance appraisal, the provisions for various feedback requirements, processes to recognise and deal with performance problems including training, and informal and formal grievance procedures.

PART A – Developing procedures for performance appraisal

1. Choose 3 different positions relevant to your industry or area of study in Hospitality, Tourism or Events and determine at least 7 tasks or responsibilities of each role. Use the attached document “Performance- agreement-template.docx” or suitable documents sourced from http://www.fairwork.gov.au/about- us/policies-and-guides/templates (Managing performance), to record your tasks and

Examples for different positions and job roles in these sectors can be accessed under following links: http://www.thejobilove.com.au/category.php?id=15 (hospitality) http://www.thejobilove.com.au/category.php?id=13 (travel and tourism) http://www.thejobilove.com.au/category.php?id=14 (events)

2. For each job role and each task, establish the key performance indicators. The following links can help you to define these:

http://www.profitablehospitality.com/public/88.cfm

Position Description – Executive Sous Chef

3. Develop measurable criteria which you will use to base your questions for the individual appraisals

  1. The criteria need to be measurable g. in form of a rating scale that measures the level of performance.
  2. Ensure that each of the key aspects listed below are incorporated into the key outcomes and key performance
  3. Compile these criteria into a checklist for each job role that can be used for monitoring the effectiveness of staff as they perform their day-to-day duties in Assessment 3, Practical

Key Aspects:

  • adherence to procedures
  • cost minimisation
  • customer service standards
  • level of accuracy in work
  • personal presentation
  • productivity
  • punctuality
  • response times
  • team interaction
  • waste minimisation

4. Develop the annual performance review document addressing the criteria developed in Question 3 which will be used for the staff performance appraisal

See example review templates at:

https://www.fairwork.gov.au/how-we-will-help/templates-and-guides/best-practice-guides/managing- underperformance

http://www.business.vic.gov.au/hiring-and-managing-staff/staff-management/review-staff-performance

Note: if a sample template is selected, you must amend the existing criteria therein to reflect those you have developed in Question 3.

PART B – Report

Write a report that clearly outlines how you will implement the performance appraisal for your 3 staff. Your report needs to include the following details:

  1. Notification of staff and timelines of what will occur, how and when
  2. Who will participate in the review process
  3. How the review will be administered
  4. How you will identify performance problems based on your criteria which you have developed in PART A
  5. Provisions for training and professional development: How these are determined and which options could be used to manage this effectively
  6. Grievance procedures
  7. Informal and formal counselling options including options for problem solving techniques
  8. Provisions and options for recognising and rewarding outstanding performance
  9. Procedures for disagreements of performance
  10. Documentation and record keeping requirements

PART A – Developing procedures for performance appraisal

  1. Choose 3 different positions relevant to your industry or area of study in Hospitality, Tourism or Events and determineat least 7 tasks or responsibilities of each role. Use the attached document “Performance- agreement-template.docx” or suitable documents sourced from http://www.fairwork.gov.au/about- us/policies-and-guides/templates (Managing performance),to record your tasks and

Examples for different positions and job roles in these sectors can be accessed under following links:

Hospitality

Ref Link: http://www.thejobilove.com.au/category.php?id=15 (hospitality)

Positions:

  1. Waiter
  2. Chef
  3. Restaurant Manager

Responsibilities: Waiter

  • Greet and escort customers to their tables
  • Present menu and provide detailed information when asked (e.g. about portions, ingredients or potential food allergies)
  • Prepare tables by setting up linens, silverware and glasses
  • Inform customers about the day’s specials
  • Offer menu recommendations upon request
  • Up-sell additional products when appropriate
  • Take accurate food and drinks orders, using a POS ordering software, order slips or by memorization
  • Check customers’ IDs to ensure they meet minimum age requirements for consumption of alcoholic beverages
  • Communicate order details to the Kitchen Staff
  • Serve food and drink orders
  • Check dishes and kitchenware for cleanliness and presentation and report any problems
  • Arrange table settings and maintain a tidy dining area
  • Deliver checks and collect bill payments
  • Carry dirty plates, glasses and silverware to kitchen for cleaning
  • Meet with restaurant staff to review daily specials, changes on the menu and service specifications for reservations (e.g. parties)
  • Follow all relevant health department regulations
  • Provide excellent customer service to guests

Responsibilities: Chef

Career Overview

Chefs are in charge of planning menus and creating meals in restaurants and a variety of other settings. The typical job duties of chefs also depend on the specific kitchen and what kind of support team a chef has to work with. According to the College Board (www.collegeboard.com), sous, pastry, and cuisine chefs do the cooking, while executive chefs primarily plan menus and supervise the kitchen staff.

Important Facts About Chefs

On-the-Job Training

Internships and apprenticeships offered

Work Environment

Work settings other than restaurants include cafeterias, hotels, private households

Certification

Not required, but can increase pay

Similar Occupations

Baker, food service manager, food preparation worker

Duties and Responsibilities

According to the Bureau of Labour Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov), chefs are in charge of measuring, mixing, and cooking ingredients according to recipes. A chef must know how to operate and use various equipment, including pans, pots, cutlery, ovens, grills, slicers, boilers, grinders, and blenders. While chefs are expected to have extensive knowledge in the culinary arts, many take on a managerial role in the kitchen. Chefs can oversee kitchen workers, order food supplies, estimate food requirements, and maintain quality assurance on various dishes. Chefs have the following additional duties:

  • Creating recipes and preparing meals
  • Hiring staff
  • Balancing a restaurant's books
  • Doing public relations
  • Planning menus
  • Filling orders
  • Catering to customers

Responsibilities: Restaurant Manager

  • Coordinate daily Front of the House and Back of the House restaurant operations
  • Deliver superior service and maximize customer satisfaction
  • Respond efficiently and accurately to customer complaints
  • Regularly review product quality and research new vendors
  • Organize and supervise shifts
  • Appraise staff performance and provide feedback to improve productivity
  • Estimate future needs for goods, kitchen utensils and cleaning products
  • Ensure compliance with sanitation and safety regulations
  • Manage restaurant’s good image and suggest ways to improve it
  • Control operational costs and identify measures to cut waste
  • Create detailed reports on weekly, monthly and annual revenues and expenses
  • Promote the brand in the local community through word-of-mouth and restaurant events
  • Recommend ways to reach a broader audience (e.g. discounts and social media ads)
  • Train new and current employees on proper customer service practices
  • Implement policies and protocols that will maintain future restaurant operations

2. For each job role and each task, establish the key performance indicators. The following links can help you to define these:

KPI: Waiter

  • Performance appraisal Performance review phrases Top materials: top sales KPIs, Performance appraisal methods Interview questions and answers.
  • Define operational objectives for Construction technician monthly, quarterly, 6 months, Identify Key Result Areas for the Construction technician. Identify tasks list. Determine work procedure for each KRA, each task. Identify methods to measure the results of each KRA, task, procedure. Create Construction technician KPIs Top materials: top sales KPIs,
  • Mistakes in creating restaurant waiter KPIs Building KPI system plays an important role in evaluating job performance of individual parts, divisions and the company’s objectives and performance management system in general. The development of KPI metrics help to create measurement systems, information systems throughout the
  • KPIs should be clearly linked to the strategy, e. the things that matter the most. KPIs should be primarily designed to empower employees and provide them with the relevant information to learn.
  • Process KPIs - measure the efficiency or productivity of a business Examples - Days to deliver an order. Input KPIs - measure assets and resources invested in or used to generate business results. Examples - Dollars spent on research and development, Funding for employee training, Quality of raw materials. Output KPIs - measure the financial and nonfinancial results of business activities. Examples - Revenues, Number of new customers acquired.

KPI: Chef

Key Performance Indicators are important metrics that can be derived through Business Intelligence software, and help a restaurant improve its profit margin. With the right BI platform, KPIs can be captured in real-time and displayed via a dashboard that provides an easy to understand, at-a-glance view of KPIs. With the click of a mouse or tap of a screen, drill down capabilities can be implemented to reveal specific details that pertain to the KPI. A few KPIs for the restaurant industry include:

Food Costs:

Food purchases can be measured against food sales. A food cost per head can be determined to establish the profit margin per customer. A trigger can be set to highlight in red if the % goes above a certain amount. The ability to drill down to exact food elements, such as cheeses or sauces can be useful to determine if there is excess usage on particular menu items.

Kitchen Labour:

Kitchen labour can be measured against food sales. Drilling down to hours per section is a great way to report on productivity. You may find you can scale back on labour during certain days of the week or shifts.

Seating:

How often are your tables being turned over? Is high-turnover affecting the customer service? These numbers are great to evaluate all areas of turnover time. Drill down for # of seats, clearing time and cooking time. Perhaps more staff is required to improve the clean-up time.

Basket Items:

Analyse drill down data to see what your morning coffee drinkers order. How many items are evening diners ordering before dinner and after dinner? Is there room for improvement in upselling? Become aware of patterns, capitalize on the profitable ones and minimize those that are detrimental to your profit margin.

These are just a few of the basic KPIs that can help you boost profits. Customized reports, score cards and alerts can also go a long way toward helping your gain better insights into your restaurant, cut costs and improve sales.

KPI: Restaurant Manager

Our time is precious – we want to spend it focused on growing your business, not putting out fires.

One effective way to make sure your business is on track is to monitor key performance indicators, known as KPIs. KPIs are business metrics that help you monitor and improve the financial progress of your restaurant. Top managers around the world use them to ensure the success of their operations.

With these five KPIs, you can increase sales and profitability, and make measured adjustments to help your business grow:

Cash Flow

Answers the question: Can I pay my bills, staff, and suppliers?

Revenue Per Available Seat Hour

Answers the question: Am I maximizing revenues for my restaurant’s capacity?

Employee Turnover

Answers the question: Am I doing a good job at keeping my best employees?

Prime Costs

Answers the question: How well am I managing my biggest expenses for the restaurant?

Menu Item Profitability

Answers the question: Is my menu as profitable as it could be?

3. Develop measurable criteria which you will use to base your questions for the individual appraisals on.

The criteria need to be measurable g. in form of a rating scale that measures the level of performance.

In comments made at the committee's first meeting, the Assistant provide methodological guidance that could be used in selecting measures of quality. In response, the committee reviewed a number of existing resources for sample

TABLE 2-1Quick Comparison of Published Criteria for Measure Selection (Detailed Table Provided in Appendix B)

Category of Criteria

Published Criteria

Chef

Waiter

Manager

punctuality

X

X

X

cost minimisation

X

unclear

X

productivity

X

x

X

team interaction

x

n/a

X

level of accuracy in work

X

x

X

NOTES: X indicates that the published criteria included one or more items in the category listed in the first column; n/a = not applicable.

b. Ensure that each of the key aspects listed below are incorporated into the key outcomes and key performance indicators.

  1. Compile these criteria into a checklist for each job role that can be used for monitoring the effectiveness of staff as they perform their day-to-day duties in Assessment 3, Practical

Key Aspects:

  • adherence to procedures
  • cost minimisation
  • customer service standards
  • level of accuracy in work
  • personal presentation
  • productivity
  • punctuality
  • response times
  • team interaction
  • waste minimisation

Instance

Staff members monitored

Performance standards monitored

 

Instance 1:

adherence to procedures cost minimization customer service standards level of accuracy in work personal presentation productivity

punctuality response times team interaction

waste minimization

Y (Y)

(Y)

Y

Y

 

Date:

 

06/12/2019

 

Duration

Chef

 
 

From:

 

_11/12/2016_

 

_

 

To:

 

_11/12/2018_

 
 

_

 

Instance 2:

adherence to procedures cost minimization customer service standards level of accuracy in work personal presentation productivity

punctuality response times team interaction

waste minimization

Y

Y Y

Y

Y Y

 

Date:

 

06/12/2019

 

Waiter

 

Duration

 

From:

 

_04/08/2015

 

To:

 

_04/08/2018

 
 
 

Instance 3: Date:

_06/12/2019

Restaurant Manager

Job role:

adherence to procedures cost minimization customer service standards level of accuracy in work personal presentation productivity

punctuality response times team interaction

waste minimisation

Y Y

Y Y

Y

 
 
 

Duration From: 01/16/2016

To:

_01/06/2018

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4. Develop the annual performance review document addressing the criteria developed in Question 3 which will be used for the staff performance appraisal

A basic sample could include but is not limited to: http://www.outbackhospitality.com.au/documents/322717/756394/Employee%20Performance

%20Appraisal.pdf

Note: If the sample document is selected, you must amend the existing criteria therein to reflect those you have developed in Question 3.

1. Performance agreement template Employee:

Task/responsibilities

Key outcomes

Actual Performance Rate

(List the tasks and areas of responsibilities relevant to the

position here)

(Describe what doing the job well looks like here)

(Comments on performance as at review out of 10)

Check with customers to ensure that

they are enjoying their meals

take action to correct any problems.

7.5

Collect payments from customers

Process customer bills or payments

8

Write patrons' food orders on order slips, memorize orders, or enter orders into computers for transmittal to kitchen staff

✓ Communicate dining or order details to kitchen personnel.

✓ Take customer orders

7

Employer Signature: Asad Employee Signature: Hamza

2. Performance agreement template Employee:

Task/responsibilities

Key outcomes

Actual Performance

(List the tasks and areas of responsibilities relevant to the position

here)

(Describe what doing the job well looks like here)

(Comments on performance as at review dates here)

Plan and direct food preparation and

culinary activities

Proven working experience as a

head chef

8

Supervise kitchen staff’s activities

Ability to spot and resolve

problems efficiently

8

Modify menus or create new ones that

meet quality standards

Capable of delegating multiple

tasks

8

Employer Signature: Asad Employee Signature: Ammar

3. Performance agreement template Employee:

Task/responsibilities

Key outcomes

Actual Performance

(List the tasks and areas of responsibilities relevant to the

position here)

(Describe what doing the job well looks like here)

(Comments on performance as at review dates here)

recruiting, training and supervising staff

making improvements to the running of the business and

developing the restaurant

8

ensuring compliance with licensing, hygiene and health and safety legislation/guidelines

handling administration and paperwork

8

promoting and marketing the business

setting targets

8

Employer Signature: Employee Signature:

PART B – Report

Write a report that clearly outlines how you will implement the performance appraisal for your 3 staff. Your report needs to include the following details:

  1. Notification of staff and timelines of what will occur, how and when
  2. Who will participate in the review process
  3. How the review will be administered
  4. How you will identify performance problems based on your criteria which you have developed in PART A
  5. Provisions for training and professional development: How these are determined and which options could be used to manage this effectively
  6. Grievance procedures
  7. Informal and formal counselling options including options for problem solving techniques
  8. Provisions and options for recognising and rewarding outstanding performance
  9. Procedures for disagreements of performance
  10. Documentation and record keeping requirements

Report

Corrections

Employee:(insert employee’s name here) Role:(insert employee’s role here) Date:(insert date here)

Review dates

Task/responsibilities

Key outcomes

Actual Performance

(List the tasks and areas of responsibilities relevant to the position

here)

(Describe what doing the job well looks like here)

(Comments on performance as at review dates here)

Employer Signature:

Employee Signature:

Development agreement

The following development needs have been discussed and agreed to be undertaken over the next <number of> months.

Areas for development

Actions

(Insert tasks, skills or behaviours that

following discussions are agreed to require development here)

(Insertactivities that will assist in development. They could be

class training at TAFE, on-the-job training, coaching from someone with the required skill here)

Employer Signature:

Employee Signature:

This template will be used to present the performance appraisals and on the base of this report the company will assess the future decisions.

The Performance Review—Only Part of an Ongoing Process

Frequently when performance management is mentioned, people think of the employee performance appraisal or review. Performance management, however, involves so much more. Properly constructed

appraisals should represent a summary of an ongoing, year-round dialogue. Focusing only on an annual appraisal form leads to misunderstanding and under appreciation of the benefits of performance management.

An effective performance management process enables managers to evaluate and measure individual performance and optimize productivity by:

  • Aligning individual employee's day-to-day actions with strategic business objectives
  • Providing visibility and clarifying accountability related to performance expectations
  • Documenting individual performance to support compensation and career planning decisions
  • Establishing focus for skill development and learning activity choices
  • Creating documentation for legal purposes, to support decisions and reduce disputes
  • When effectively implemented, performance management best practices result in a wide range of benefits for employees, managers and

Organization-wide

Supervisors / Managers

Employees

Savings

Time Savings

Clarification of Expectations

Accuracy

Reduced Conflicts

Improved Self-assessment

Accountability

Visible Accountability

Improved Performance

Productivity

Efficiency

Career Paths

Retention

Consistency

Job Satisfaction

Communication

Performance

Performance

10 Ways to Optimize the Performance Review Process

Set Goals Effectively

Goals are the basis of an effective process. There are two key elements to consider when developing goals. First, are goals written clearly and objectively? Second, are they directly contributing to the achievement of business strategy?

Clearly communicating strategic business objectives is the first step to creating alignment. Providing visibility to goals set by departments across the organization furthers alignment. Typically, the process begins with departmental managers setting goals for their departments, based upon organization-wide goals, which support the general business strategy. Making departmental goals accessible to all managers ensures there is no overlap, reduces conflict, and allows members of different departments to see where they support each other and ensure they are not working at cross purposes. Each manager in turn shares the overall goals with his/her department and meets with employees to identify individual performance goals and plans.

When setting goals, key job expectations and responsibilities should act as the main guide and reference. Goals should be set that not only address what is expected, but also how it will be achieved. For example, the "what" covers quality or quantity expected, deadlines to be met, cost to deliver, etc. The "how" refers to the behaviour demonstrated to achieve outcomes, for example, focus on customer service. In addition, some organizations choose to include competencies within performance expectations, to reinforce the link to business strategy, vision and mission.

An accepted framework to use to help write effective goals is the "SMART" goal:

S - Specific

M - Measurable

A - Achievable/Attainable

R - Results oriented/Realistic/Relevant T - Time bound

The inclusion of the above criteria results in a goal that is understandable and easily visualized and evaluated. Making a goal specific, measurable, and time bound contributes to the ability to make progress on the goal and track that progress. Some managers choose to further define goals with a start and finish date with milestones in between. As we have mentioned, goals must be achievable and realistic. An unachievable goal is just that. An employee knows when he/she does not stand a chance of reaching it, and their effort to achieve the goal will be affected. In addition, goals must reflect conditions that are under the employee's control and the R's (results oriented, realistic and relevant) should definitely consider these conditions. Sometimes the focus on the outcome of the goals can overshadow the necessary steps to achieve them. Action plans to support each goal can include documentation of the steps necessary to achieve a goal. By keeping goals relevant, a manager reinforces the importance of linking to strategic objectives and communicating why the goal is important. Some organizations have suggested the use of SMARTA, or SMARTR with the additional A standing for aligned and the R standing for reward.

A focus on objective, behavioural-based, and observable outcomes that are job-related helps ensure fairness of the process and reduces discrepancy. Although sometimes difficult to hear, objective feedback supported with regular documentation is difficult to dispute. This is also where an understanding of the organization's overall objectives and goals and how individual efforts contribute becomes essential. If for example, an individual understands that their actions support an area of the business then it is easier to understand the impact when deadlines are not met. Using the SMART framework provides clarity up front to employees who will be evaluated against these goals.

2.  Begin with Performance Planning

Using established goals as a basis, performance planning sets the stage for the year by communicating objectives, and setting an actionable plan to guide the employee to successfully achieve goals.

Performance planning, as with all other steps, is a collaborative process between the manager and employee, although there will always be some elements that are non-negotiable. Begin with the job description and identify major job expectations; expectations then can be clarified for each major area.

Under each key contribution area, it is important to identify long-term and short-term goals, along with an action plan around how they will be achieved. Goals can be weighted to identify priorities. Discuss specific details related to how progress against goals will be evaluated. Next steps include determining any obstacles that would stand in the way of these goals being achieved. If an obstacle is knowledge, skills or behaviour–a plan should be developed to overcome, i.e.; training, mentoring, etc.

Using the performance planning document as a reference document, the employee and manager then should regularly monitor progress against goals, problem solve road blocks, re-assess goals, change goals as business direction changes, and re-evaluate training and resource needs. This is where the conversation is critical and often where the follow through sometimes falls down. Performance planning and ongoing performance feedback are critical because they facilitate continuous improvement and aid open communication.

3.  Ensure an Ongoing Process

As the following diagram illustrates, goal setting, performance planning, performance monitoring, feedback and coaching is ongoing and supports the creation of the performance appraisal, which in turn supports processes related to rewards, learning and development. Performance monitoring, feedback and coaching creates a separate feedback loop within the larger loop which should take place more often, allowing for necessary adjustments to performance planning as conditions dictate.

4.  Improve Productivity Through Better Goal Management

Regular goal tracking allows for the opportunity to provide feedback as needed, make adjustments to performance plans, tackle obstacles and prepare contingencies for missed deadlines. Without a mechanism to regularly track progress against goals, the ongoing, cyclical nature of the process falls apart.

Goal progress discussions, along with all performance feedback, should be delivered with respect and should be objective and supportive. Specific examples provide clarity and help the employee focus on future improvements. It is crucial that the manager listens to the employee's perspective and incorporates the employee's observations into future plans– the employee often experiences roadblocks the manager may not see.

5.  Gather Information from a Number of Sources

Gathering performance information from a variety of sources increases objectivity and ensures all factors impacting performance are considered. This information should include objective data like sales reports, call records or deadline reports. Other valuable information includes: feedback from others, results of personal observation, documentation of ongoing dialogue, records of any external or environmental factors impacting performance. Many reviews also include an employee self-evaluation. Other documents that help define performance objectives include: past performance appraisals, current departmental and organizational objectives and documented standards related to career goals.

In order to gather feedback from other employees, organizations will often use a 360° feedback process. Along with the completion of a self-assessment, selected peers, subordinates, and manager(s) are asked to contribute feedback around pre-identified areas. The feedback is based upon specifically identified skills or competencies and the final results are compared against the employee's self-assessment. This type of feedback increases self-awareness and in some cases, is used to support the performance evaluation process.

Objectivity is essential when evaluating performance and it begins with clarity about job expectations and evaluation methods. Certain checks and balances can be built in to ensure objectivity. Managers commonly make mistakes when they conduct evaluations and the first step to minimizing those errors is to acknowledge they exist. Consistent processes organization-wide contribute to fairness and objectivity. Access to information allows others to check the validity of the process. Obviously, not all employees need access to other employees' performance appraisal results, but processes like calibration meetings will help ensure consistency. In the calibration process, managers with employees in similar positions meet and discuss the appraisals before they are finalized and shared with the employees. A calibration meeting helps establish the reasons individuals are awarded various performance rankings, educates managers about the process across the organization and promotes consistency. It also provides validation for manager's decisions, if appropriate.

Reporting is very valuable to assess the fairness/consistency of the process–for example, to compare ratings in one division to the next or for one manager to the next.

6.  Document, Document, Document

Note taking must be consistent and include all significant occurrences, positive or negative. Documentation is important to support performance decisions, and notes should be written with the intent to share. In addition to documenting the details of an occurrence, any subsequent follow up should be detailed.

The performance log is a record that the manager keeps for each employee and is a record of performance "events." The maintenance of a performance log serves a number of purposes. The manager can record successes or performance that requires improvement. When it comes time to complete the appraisal, the manager has a historical record of events and will not have to rely on recent memory. In addition, this documentation can be used to support performance decisions or ratings. But it also can be used as a reminder for the manager–if the log has no recordings for a period of time, perhaps it is time to check in. If an employee does exceptionally well, or meets deadlines consistently, the log can be used as a reminder to provide recognition for a job well done. In addition, if a manager notices an area of deficiency, the log can serve as a reminder and a record of circumstances. The performance log can also act as a reminder for coaching i.e.: record of upcoming tasks, manager can make note to discuss with the employee to ensure he/she is prepared for the individual for a task ahead, and then follow up discussion can promote learning and continuous improvement.

This log should be created using the same principles of performance management and should be objective, based on observable, job-related behaviours, including successes, achievements and, if applicable, any documentation related to disciplinary actions taken.

7.  Adequately Prepare and Train Your Managers

Managing the performance of another individual is not an easy task and requires many skills. Training may be required to ensure managers feel adequately prepared to effectively complete all the tasks related to performance management. This is especially the case for newly promoted supervisors.

Managers need to understand human behaviour, how to motivate, how to develop, provide coaching and deal with conflict. To a great extent, managers must be observers and able to assess a situation, provide motivation and identify problems that interfere with performance. In addition, managers must understand that individuals at different levels of comfort, ability and experience with their jobs will require different levels of input, support and supervision. A manager who feels adequately prepared to provide and receive feedback, deliver a performance evaluation and conduct a performance evaluation meeting will be a major contributor to a successfully functioning process.

8. The Review

The employee performance appraisal or review should be a summary of all that has been discussed. Based upon job expectations and key areas of contribution, and previously discussed goals and evaluation methods, the appraisal should be a written confirmation of what has already been discussed with the employee.

The form should include key job responsibilities, current project work, relevant competencies, goals and achievements. Previously completed performance appraisals should be used as reference documents. It should also contain an area to allow employees to record their comment and input. All comments included on the appraisal form need to be job-related and based upon observable behaviours.

For the appraisal meeting, it is imperative to prepare ahead of time. Schedule an appropriate place and time with no interruptions. Ensure the employee has the information necessary to allow them to prepare adequately. Begin the discussion with job requirements and strengths/ accomplishments. The focus, as pointed out previously, should be forward looking. The way the manager approaches this meeting conveys a message related to its importance and should be approached with the appropriate level of seriousness and an open mind. The manager must be prepared in regard to what he/she wants to discuss, but just as importantly must be prepared to listen.

Many suggest that it is important to first define the purpose of the meeting and provide an agenda. A factual discussion with a focus on job-related behaviours will keep the discussion objective. At the end of the meeting, key points should be summarized. It is important to note that the employee will be asked to sign the appraisal, whether or not there is agreement.

9.  Link Performance Management with Rewards and Recognition

More and more, organizations are linking performance to compensation. This link, however, cannot effectively be established without the existence of sound performance management processes that are seen as fair and equitable.

Clear documentation of progress against performance expectations also allows proper recognition for a job well done. This can be provided a number of ways, i.e.: formal recognition events, informal public recognition or privately delivered feedback.

It is important also to note the benefits of a consistent process across the organization. A consistent process creates a sense of fairness and significantly increases job satisfaction. This is even more critical if compensation is linked to performance. Employees need to know that if an individual in one department is identified as a top performer and compensated accordingly, then an employee performing at the same level in another department will receive similar rewards.

10.  Evaluate and Encourage Full Participation and Success

There is widespread recognition that an annual meeting to evaluate progress does not have the same benefits as ongoing dialogue and feedback. Feedback that is delivered when it is most relevant enhances learning and provides the opportunity to make necessary accommodations in order to meet objectives. Some organizations are moving towards conducting performance reviews twice a year, while a small portion is trying to conduct them more frequently. Regardless of frequency, the attitude towards ongoing feedback is crucial. If there is organizational recognition and support for the need to build constructive feedback into the fabric of day-to-day interactions combined with increased visibility into goals, then the environment will encourage development and drive goal-directed performance improvement.

Design the process right. The performance management process must add value, otherwise problems with resistance and non-participation will surface. In addition, the process itself must be efficient and as simple as possible, while still providing the necessary value. Automated reminders and scheduling tools can help keep the process on track.

Another element to consider that contributes to success is upper level management support. This support needs to take not only the form of verbal support, but also through participation in the same performance management process for evaluations. In addition, consider the current culture of your organization when it comes to performance appraisals and performance management. Is the "atmosphere" supportive of an effective process? Is there a culture of open honest communication or are employees fearful when they make a mistake? Employees must be able to honestly discuss performance and consider how to make improvements in order to move forward.

References

  1. https://resources.workable.com/waiter-or-waitress-job-description
  2. https://learn.org/articles/What_are_the_Typical_Job_Duties_of_a_Chef.html
  3. https://resources.workable.com/restaurant-manager-job-description
  4. https://www.yurbi.com/blog/4-key-performance-indicators-for-the-restaurant-industry/
  5. https://successfactors.com/en_us/lp/articles/optimize-performance-management.html#
  6. https://business.vic.gov.au/hiring-and-managing-staff/staff-management/review-staff- performance-3?utm_expid=3035502-17.C8EYKvdETKKbtF5fbUChgQ.2&utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com.au%2F
  7. http://www.myplan.com/careers/waiters-and-waitresses/description-35-3031.00.html
  8. https://resources.workable.com/executive-chef-job-description
  9. https://targetjobs.co.uk/careers-advice/job-descriptions/278839-restaurant-manager-job-description
Want answer for this Assignment
Tap to Chat
Get Instant Assignment Help
Tap to Chat
Get Instant Assignment Help