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3CX Basic Certification

All content in document is found on www.3cx.com Website

https://www.3cx.com/3cxacademy/

1-Installing 3CX

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8p56O4p688&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=2&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. This module will concentrate on the installation of 3CX.

[SLIDE 2]

To begin with, we will be going through the prerequisites of the system and the network. We will also discuss the general concepts of how the FQDNs and SSL Certificates work, and walk you through the installation of 3CX by going through the Web Based Setup Wizard.

[SLIDE 3]

3CX can be installed on either a Windows or Linux Operating System. The supported Windows versions are Windows 10, or if you prefer a Windows Server Operating System, anything newer than Microsoft Server 2012R2. If you want to install 3CX on Linux, you can do so on an existing Debian 9 Stretch installation, or you can use the 3CX ISO, which will install both the Operating System, and 3CX. Bear in mind that all these Operating Systems must be of a 64-bit architecture. 3CX Cannot be installed on a 32 bit operating system.

3CX can also be installed on a Raspberry Pi for installations up to 8 Simultaneous Calls. Standard, PRO and Enterprise editions can be installed on a Raspberry Pi.

[SLIDE 4]

If you decide to use a Windows Operating System, you must make sure that all Windows Updates have been installed, prior to starting the installation process. .NET 4.6.1 or higher must also be installed on the system, along with all its updates, as it is crucial for the smooth operation of 3CX.

With 3CX’s Modern interface, a compatible browser is required. 3CX is entirely configured using a web browser. This can either be Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft Edge. Avoid using Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

The system 3CX will be installed on, must be as free as possible of any 3rd party applications. Applications that have been known to interfere with 3CX when installed on the same machine are, Microsoft Exchange, MS SQL, DNS Server software or roles, and VPN software or adapters. As most of these packages or services exist on the network, prior to the deployment of 3CX, we recommend that 3CX is installed on a fresh, dedicated machine.

Anti-Virus software packages have also been known to sometimes cause issues, so if you do have one installed, make sure you have added the necessary exceptions in its settings. That means excluding the 3CX data folders. Also, make sure that the HTTP and HTTPS ports are excluded from network traffic scans.

[SLIDE 5]

When installing on a Linux Operating System, the installation process automatically installs all necessary updates, so no extra steps are required. The only requirement is that no other software is installed. It must dedicated for use by 3CX.

[SLIDE 6]

If you decide to install 3CX in a Virtualized environment, not all Hypervisor Platforms may be up to the task. For this reason, we advise that you use one of the platforms which we have tested.

These will provide you with a trouble-free experience and the maximum level of support from the 3CX Support Team, should any issue occur.

The Virtualization platforms that have been tested are Microsoft Hyper-V, VMWare ESXi, KVM and Citrix XenServer. When using these platforms, please ensure to check, and conform to the minimum version requirements.

[SLIDE 7]

Installing the Linux edition is easy with the 3CX ISO. This can be used for a local, bare metal machine, or a local Hypervisor.

For Hosted Platforms, the ones that have been tested are Openstack with KVM - many data centres use this infrastructure including Amazon AWS with EC2 and lightsail machines, Google Cloud Engine, Microsoft’s Azure platform and OVH. These can be deployed using the 3CX PBX Express wizard, which will allow you with a very simple wizard, to deploy your PBX, hassle free.

Any other Openstack Version 2 compatible provider can also be used, but you will need to manually add the API details to link the provider to PBX Express. We cover this in more detail in the PBX Express module, in the intermediate training course.

For other cloud hosting providers, you can use the apt-get command to install 3CX on a Debian 9 installation.

[SLIDE 8]

So, what are the hardware requirements? Hardware specifications primarily depend on the deployment size. You can find our suggested requirements at the link shown in the slide, or by performing a search on our website. These specifications can be for either a Bare Metal, standalone machine, or within a virtualized environment locally, or in the cloud.

Let’s go into this a little further.

If, for example, you intend on recording the calls on your system, the size of the Hard Disk is crucial. Also, because recordings are written to the disk on the fly, you must ensure that the Hard Disk’s Read/Write speeds can cover your call recording needs. In the recordings module we will also cover the archiving of recordings, and how this will affect your disk usage.

The more extensions configured and provisioned on your PBX, the more memory will be required for the BLF updating and presence information to be relayed.

Finally, the audio of calls to and from VoIP Providers passes through the 3CX PBX. Depending on the amount of concurrent active calls you predict you will have, you may need to adjust the RAM size of your server. For this you can use the minimum system requirements as a reference.

[SLIDE 9]

The network requirements of 3CX are simple. Connect the 3CX Server to the network using a wired connection. Also, if you intend to use the installation as an on-premise setup, meaning that the users and the 3CX server will be on the same LAN, then the IP addresses that this LAN uses must be in a private range as defined by RFC 1918.

Using an RFC compliant addressing scheme internally allows access to the PBX via the IP Address, and not the FQDN of the PBX as well as provisioning via HTTP locally, rather than HTTPS.

3CX can be installed on a server with multiple Network Cards and can be configured to use them, however, it is recommended not to overcomplicate the network configuration of the server, if it's not necessary. In this module we are going to talk about how to install on a server with only 1 Network Card. This means that it must only have 1 IP address assigned to it, and you must disable all other unused Network Adapters. Just having them unplugged, or showing as “Not Connected” will not suffice.

[SLIDE 10]

Having an IP PBX like 3CX probably means that you are going to be using VoIP Providers for calls, and most likely you are also going to have Remote Extensions. We cover remote extensions in the two Remote Extension Modules, in the intermediate training course.

This means that in order for this communication to be possible, there will be some traffic traversing the firewall that sits between 3CX and the Internet. For this reason, having access to and configuring this firewall is required.

Another requirement 3CX has, is that it must have constant and unfiltered access to the Internet. This means that any traffic 3CX sends to the 3cx.com and 3cx.net domains must not pass through a HTTPS Proxy, and the Firewall must not perform Deep Packet Inspection, at least for traffic to these specific domains.

Failing to do this may result in problems related to activating your License Key, downloading Updates, and accessing 3CX WebMeeting.

Also, having a Public Static IP, although not mandatory in V16, is something to consider as this provides stability for all External Communications.

[SLIDE 11]

During the installation of 3CX, you will be asked to provide a License Key. 3CX currently offers 3 types of License Keys. These are:

The Standard Edition. The Standard edition has no limitation on the amount of VoIP Providers, Gateways and extensions you can create. You can make use of most of the basic features 3CX has to offer, however, there are some limitations. A 3CX FQDN, SSL certificate, and SMTP Server will need to be used.

The Pro Edition. The Pro Edition will allow for more features to be used, which includes, amongst others, Queues, Bridging 2 or more PBXs together, CRM integration and Hotel services.

The Enterprise Edition. The Enterprise Edition will allow your license to be activated on another server at the same time, thus opening the opportunity for Failover solutions and scenarios. The Enterprise license also enables some more advanced features, which will benefit a corporate admin, giving them access to phone customisation as well as increased control of call recordings.

For a more detailed comparison of the features each key has, you can go to our feature comparison page, at the link shown. (https://www.3cx.com/phone-system/edition-comparison/)

[SLIDE 12]

If you don't already have one, you can get an Annual License key with 16SC FREE for a year. This license will have the PRO edition features enabled for 2 months, and will then revert to Standard, for the rest of the 1st year. You can get the free license key by filling in the form found in the link during the installation process. Having a License Key before beginning the installation process is important, as it is one of the first things the installer will be asking for. (https://www.3cx.com/voip-ip-pbx)

[SLIDE 13]

3CX requires an FQDN in order to be set up. Using an FQDN makes connecting remote 3CX Apps seamless. It's also more secure, since all remote connections will be via HTTPS using SSL certificates.

Fortunately 3CX handles all of this for you. 3CX will set up an FQDN for you with the subdomain of your choice, and will also create and automatically configure Let’s Encrypt SSL certificates for it.

This will provide secure connections for all Browsers and Remote IP Phones connecting to your server, over the Internet.

For more information concerning SSL certificates, and their use with 3CX, use the link shown, to go to our guide on how to use SSL certificates. (https://www.3cx.com/blog/docs/ssl-crt-csr/)

[SLIDE 14]

Earlier in this module, we mentioned that having a Static Public IP address is recommended. It is possible to have a Dynamic IP, but when your IP changes, you will experience some downtime on your PBX, for any calls to and from outside numbers or remote Apps. This is due to the time it takes for the new IP to become known to the outside world. This process is called DNS propagation. This is why we only recommend using a Dynamic IP for testing purposes.

If you are using a Dynamic IP, be sure to use a 3CX supplied FQDN, as 3CX will automatically update your FQDN’s DNS records when it detects a new Public IP Address. 3CX will also keep your SSL certificate and FQDN active, as long as a maintenance agreement is active on a perpetual license key, or an annual key is kept current.

[SLIDE 15]

In this module we will use a 3CX FQDN. This is an easy and reliable choice, and requires the least amount of configuration. You will be asked for your choice of subdomain, as well as your preferred domain. You can choose amongst various 3CX Top Level Domains, which are separated into different regions. If the hostname is available, the installation wizard will automatically create all the necessary DNS entries, assign the FQDN to the license key, generate an SSL Certificate, download it, and apply it to the installation.

[SLIDE 16]

At some point, the installer will also ask you which HTTP and HTTPS ports you want to use. Although the default values are 5000 and 5001, you can also choose 80 and 443 instead, as we are using the versatile NGINX Web Server for 3CX. This is assuming, of course, that no other application is using these ports, such as IIS.

In addition to the Web server ports, you will also be asked to choose the SIP and Tunnel ports of the PBX.

These ports can only be configured during the installation of the PBX. You are not restricted to port 5060 as the SIP port, to utilise the plug and play method of provisioning phones in 3CX.

[SLIDE 17]

If you choose to use an Internal FQDN, create an A Record on your Local DNS Server before starting the installation process. This must point to the LAN IP Address of the 3CX Server. Then, go through the PBXconfigTool until you get prompted with the option to use your own managed DNS. At this point, use the option to enter your Local FQDN.

If you do not want to use an Internal FQDN, just use the “Local IP” option.

[SLIDE 18]

Contrary to the External FQDN, which is mandatory, having an Internal FQDN is not always required, and instead, you can use the Private IP address of the 3CX Server. You will, however, need an Internal FQDN if you want to have a Split DNS configuration, or configure a Failover solution. In this case you will have to provide your own Certificate during installation, and you must use a Static Public IP address, as well as a Local DNS and DHCP Server which you can configure.

[SLIDE 19]

Next, you must choose the Extension Digit Length of the PBX. This is a very important decision to make, as this is something that can never be changed unless you reinstall and configure the system from scratch. A backup and restore, will restore the previous extension digit length. Always factor in future growth when selecting the extension digit length.

[SLIDE 20]

Next, you will be asked to enter an email address, to which the system will send important notifications like system update information, backup and restore progress, various system warnings, and informational notifications.

Also, you will be asked to fill in the SMTP Server information, which 3CX will use to dispatch emails. The System will use this SMTP server to send Reports, Welcome Emails, Faxes, Voicemails and Notification Emails, in addition to the emails to the administrator mentioned above.

The option to use a 3CX built in SMTP server configuration, which doesn’t require any extra configuration from the admin, is also available. This is particularly helpful if you do not have an online email account, or your own SMTP server to use.

[SLIDE 21]

Next, you will be prompted to enter the Default Time Zone that your desk phones are going to use. This will not affect the Reports and the Time Scheduling automation, as these use the System Time. However with the Linux version, the system time will also be set at an Operating System level, making it a lot easier to manage the server time. With the Windows edition, this will still need to be set manually.

You will also have to choose the country the installation is going to be operating in. This will then allow calls to be made to numbers in that country, in an E164 format. The Voicemail Number is also set, according to the country. The default voicemail number of 3CX is 999, but if a country uses this number as an Emergency Number, the voicemail number will be set to 666. This is the case, for example, in the United Kingdom, and Singapore.

[SLIDE 22]

Finally, the last step is the license activation of 3CX. If the key is new and hasn't been registered before, the license details will be requested at this stage. If you are a 3CX Reseller, in the Reseller ID field enter your 6 digit Partner ID so that you can get credited with the revenue of this installation instantly. This System will also be assigned to you in your Partner Portal. If the information is already present, the PBX will automatically activate, while skipping this step.

[SLIDE 23]

After the license registration, you will now be able to login and access the Management Console and you are now ready to start using your new 3CX Version 16 installation.

[SLIDE 24]

For the installation demonstration, we will install 3CX in a Windows environment, on a Windows 10 Professional machine.

2-Using 3CX Web Client

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jziv96n2Cc0&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=3&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. In this module, we will focus on the use of the 3CX Web client.

[SLIDE 2]

We will cover the prerequisites for using the 3CX web Client, as well as where to find the credentials, how to login, and what you will be able to do with the Web Client.

[SLIDE 3]

The 3CX Web Client is a versatile, browser based client, designed to provide a complete end point telephony solution using WebRTC technology. It is jam packed with features which will help you in your day to day telephony and communication tasks, using just a browser. No installation of any other apps is required. And it can be used just as effectively in the office, and out! Wherever you are, just navigate to the web client URL, login and start calling.

The web client can be used as a standalone WebRTC client, but it can also be used to remote control an IP phone using uaCSTA. So for those who still have IP phones on their desks, they will still be able to use them. We will cover this functionality in the Provisioning of local IP Phones module.

One of the main benefits of 3CX, is being able to use multiple devices on the same extension, using a functionality of the SIP Protocol, called SIP Forking, where multiple devices are provisioned on the same extension. The web client is able to be used in parallel to the IP Phones, either controlling these phones, or used as a standalone client.

[SLIDE 4]

All that is required is the use of a supported browser, which are currently Google’s Chrome and Mozilla’s Firefox browsers. You will also need to be using either a Windows or MAC operating system.

Other platforms and WebRTC compliant browsers may work, but support is not provided for these by 3CX.

[SLIDE 5]

So how do you log in to use this fantastic productivity tool. Well, all that is required is access to the welcome email, which will contain the URL and credentials to login.

The welcome email, which is also covered in more detail in the 3CX Apps module, can be sent to the user easily from the Extensions page, and it is also conveniently triggered automatically upon the extensions creation.

The user will receive the email, click the link within the email, use their credentials, and will then be immersed in the 3CX web client experience!

[SLIDE 6]

Just to show you how easy sending a welcome email is, just go to the Extensions page in 3CX. Highlight the extension, or the extensions you wish to send a welcome email to, and click “Send Welcome Email”. Assuming an SMTP server is properly configured on the PBX, the email should reach the user or the users within a few seconds.

[SLIDE 7]

Logging in to the client successfully will bring you into the clear, crisp and intuitive interface of the 3CX web Client. From here we will see the various functionalities available within the client. Here we can see the People tab, which will show you the presence and status of each of the extensions.

The extension groups are in a list on the inner left column, making sorting a breeze. There is also a dynamic search bar at the top making searching for a particular person easy when there is a large number of extensions configured on the PBX.

[SLIDE 8]

Talking about a feature rich client, alot of people get carried away with the ease that various tasks can be done. But let's focus on the basics first.

Making and receiving calls! With the 3CX web Client, the ability to make and receive voice and video calls is a piece of cake. The handling of the calls is easy with the user being able to put the calls on hold, and retrieve them again from hold, transfer calls with a simple pushing of a button, and this does also include Blind or attended transfers too, escalating a call to a conference call, recording a call and so on.

All of this in a very easy to use interface, which is comforting and familiar, for those of you used to the other 3CX Apps.

[SLIDE 9]

Now, let’s go back a bit to the People tab. In addition to being able to seeing the status of the extension, namely, the presence, we are able to easily see if the extensions are in a call and where to. This does however assume that you have the rights to see this information. So if you see an extension is in a call, with the yellow dot, but not the description of the call, you might be lacking the necessary rights to see this information.

Active calls can also be seen from the switchboard of the web client. From this window, the control of calls is also possible if the relevant rights have been granted. These are covered in greater detail in the Extension Groups and Rights module, in the Intermediate training.

[SLIDE 10]

In recent years, we are seeing the trend for people to use texting and chat applications more and more. Well we wouldn't want you to feel left out when using the 3CX Web Client. Chat is an integral part of the web client and using this handy tool, it is easy to communicate with someone using chat, when you have the Monday morning blues and don't want to talk to someone on the phone. You can also very easily transfer files using the chat and express yourself with the various emoticons, available.

[SLIDE 11]

Being browser based, the web client will probably spend its time in the background, along with the other 76 browser tabs open at any time. Now, try finding that browser tab to answer the phone when a call comes in. With the desktop notifications panel, it is possible to get notified when a call is coming in, making it just a click away to answer the call.

[SLIDE 12]

Viewing the presence on the web client is very straight forward, but many people still use IP Phones. They need to be able to see the status of some extensions and perform a variety of other functions, like logging in and out of the queues, creating custom speed dials for commonly dialled numbers and changing the status of their extension.

With the 3CX web client it is very easy to create the BLFs you need, and in the web client it is also possible to rearrange them by dragging and dropping the BLF buttons!

[SLIDE 13]

For the demonstration of this module, we will receive a welcome email, and log in to the web client, and see the presence of the other extensions and use the web client to call one of these extensions, and also chat with another extension.

3-Installing 3CX Apps

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYPbTeptAYM&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=4&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. This module will concentrate on how to install a 3CX App and how to configure it with 3CX.

[SLIDE 2]

Specifically, we will be talking about the prerequisites, as well as explaining what a softphone is, the provisioning process using both the Welcome Email attachment and QR Code methods, and how all this works towards our goal, which is registering a 3CX App to an extension.

[SLIDE 3]

So, what is the 3CX App? The 3CX App allows users to make and receive calls. Apart from these basic functions though, it also adds video calls, chat, Presence View, and Video conferencing.

The 3CX App can be used anywhere, as long as you have a good internet connection, allowing you to work from anywhere.

And all of this does not mean that you need to retire your deskphone. They can work in parallel so that you can make or receive calls from either one, using the SIP Forking functionality.

SIP Forking basically, is the ability to ring multiple SIP endpoints simultaneously when calling an extension.

[SLIDE 4]

The 3CX App can be installed either on Windows, or a Mac OS, using the Operating System versions shown.

[SLIDE 5]

Additionally, it can also be installed on any Android or iOS device using the Operating Systems shown.

[SLIDE 6]

To install the 3CX App on Windows or Mac, download it from the 3CX website, or from the customer portal. For smartphones, access the respective Application Store and search for 3CX and install, just as you would any other app. There are also links to download the 3CX App, from the welcome email, which we will see further down.

[SLIDE 7]

After you have installed the 3CX App, you have to provision it. But what is Provisioning?

Provisioning, is the process of automatically configuring the 3CX App with the correct settings.

This minimizes human errors and makes it much quicker to deploy. This information is provided by the PBX and presented in a format which is understandable by the App.

[SLIDE 8]

An easy way to provision a 3CX App, is using what we call, Welcome Email Provisioning.

The procedure is identical for all 3CX App types and can be done remotely as well.

A welcome email is sent to the extension users automatically upon creating an extension, though it’s easy to resend it from the Management Console. Attached to this email is a provisioning file. The user just has to double click on this attachment, or drag and drop to the App.

Providing they have the 3CX App already installed on their device, this will launch the client and automatically configure it. That’s all there is to it!

[SLIDE 9]

All an Administrator has to do, is log into the Management Console, go to the Extensions page on the left hand menu, highlight the Extension, or extensions they want to provision, and press the “Send Welcome Email” button. Of course, make sure your phone system has a correctly configured SMTP server, and valid email addresses defined on the extensions.

[SLIDE 10]

There is also another way of provisioning a 3CX mobile App, on the iOS and Android platforms.

In addition to the Welcome Email attachment, the App can be provisioned with a QR code. This QR code can be found in the Welcome email, in the 3CX Web Client and in the extension’s settings in the 3CX Management Console.

This method is only available for the mobile platforms, which have a camera on them.

[SLIDE 11]

Within the Welcome Email, a QR code that can be used to provision the extension can be found. Just open the 3CX App and from the menu, choose Scan QR Code. This will open the camera of the phone, and after the relevant rights have been granted, you can scan the QR code which is on-screen.

[SLIDE 12]

Within the 3CX web Client, the QR code can be found in the user menu on the top right or the settings menu on the left. Select to Scan the QR code from the Apps menu. A QR code will show up on screen. Scan this from the 3CX Mobile App. If you just installed the App, you should see a prompt to scan the QR code, otherwise go to the menu to find the Scan QR Code option. Within seconds you will have a fully provisioned App.

[SLIDE 13]

Within the Management Console, in the settings of each individual extension, the QR code is also available for scanning under the “General” tab, for a 3CX Mobile App.

[SLIDE 14]

That’s it! The App will now be provisioned with all the necessary settings.

All the users need to do now is to use the App.

[SLIDE 15]

Once the App has been provisioned the user will be able to use any of the features 3CX has to offer.

On top of that, the 3CX App can be used from any location where an Internet connection is available. No extra configuration is required.

This means that if you have just provisioned your 3CX App on your mobile device, you can just turn on your mobile data and continue using your Extension from anywhere.

Although we cover this in another module, and more specifically, in the Firewall Configuration module, in order for the 3CX App to be used from outside the PBX LAN, some port forwarding will be required.

Specifically you will need to forward the 3CX Tunnel port to the 3CX Server, for TCP and UDP traffic. By default this is port 5090. However, as mentioned in the Installing 3CX Module during the installation of the PBX, you can freely choose the ports of the PBX, including the Tunnel port. Additionally, the HTTPS port which is usually 5001, should also to be open for TCP to allow for the provisioning to be successful, and to receive the presence information from the PBX.

[SLIDE 16]

Finally, our 3CX Apps for Android and iOS make use of PUSH technology. This is a native feature smartphones have, that allows applications to hibernate when they are not in use, and activate only when required. This drastically reduces the battery consumption. This means that your 3CX App on your mobile device will only wake up when you are receiving an incoming call. This requires no manual configuration from the user.

What will happen exactly, is when 3CX wants to send an incoming call to an App, the PBX will first send a PUSH request to the respective service operated by Google or Apple, which in turn will wake up your phone and launch the 3CX App. At that point, the app will connect back to the PBX to retrieve the incoming call.

[SLIDE 17]

In the demonstration for this module, the 3CX App will be installed on a Windows machine and provisioned via welcome email, and the 3CX App will be downloaded from Google Play, and provisioned via the QR code of the extension.

4-Configuring a Local desktop Telephone

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XDgy-a_4DOM&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=5&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. In this module we will be explaining how to Provision an IP Phone in the local LAN.

[SLIDE 2]

Initially we will be going through the prerequisites. Right after that I will be walking you the whole procedure of configuring an IP Phone using PnP. We will see the configuration of BLF keys in the Management Console and how these are sent to the IP Phones. Then, we will see how you can manage the firmware version of your IP Phones, and how you can Remote Control them using your 3CX Webclient.

[SLIDE 3]

Although technically it is possible to configure any SIP compliant IP Phone to work with 3CX, today we will be focussing on how to configure one from our list of supported devices.

3CX has gone through a rigorous test process for these phones as well as implemented special integration to make setup and management easier.

3CX supports Fanvil, Grandstream, Htek, snom and Yealink phones. For a complete list of models that are supported and their firmware requirements go to the 3CX Technical Support website, at www.3cx.com/support.

Today’s module will focus on configuring an IP Phone that is on the same Network as 3CX, and specifically on the same subnet.

[SLIDE 4]

Although technically it is possible to configure any SIP compliant IP Phone to work with 3CX, today we will be focussing on how to configure one from our list of supported devices.

3CX has gone through a rigorous test process for these phones as well as implemented special integration to make setup and management easier.

3CX supports Fanvil, Grandstream, Htek, snom and Yealink phones. For a complete list of models that are supported and their firmware requirements go to the 3CX Technical Support website, at www.3cx.com/support.

Today’s module will focus on configuring an IP Phone that is on the same Network as 3CX, and specifically on the same subnet.

[SLIDE 5]

As we are going to be configuring a local extension, we will use PnP Provisioning. This method is based on network multicast messages. A high-level explanation of what happens is that an IP Phone will announce its existence once it is connected to the network through a multicast message. 3CX receives this message and at this point the Administrator will see the phone in the 3CX Management Console, in the Phones page. They can now assign the device to an extension or create a new one. After that, 3CX will do the rest.

Multicast messages are limited to a local subnet and will usually not be able to go through routers, firewalls and other border devices, even to other local subnets.

[SLIDE 6]

Now to explain how to do this.

Plug your phone into the network and power it on, then wait a few minutes for the phone to boot. Once a factory reset booted, the Administrator should log into the Management Console and go to the Phones page on the left.

In the list you will find the phone you just plugged in. It will be visible with the designation “New” and will appear in bold text.

At this point, all the administrator has to do is highlight it, and select whether they want to create a new extension for this IP Phone or assign it to an existing one. An extension can have multiple phones assigned to it, with the SIP functionality called SIP Forking.

[SLIDE 7]

Once this is done, the Management Console will prompt the Administrator to validate the default settings.

At this point you can personalise the settings, for example you can change the Timezone of the phone, if it deviates from the Global timezone of the PBX, as well as the format of the Date and time. You can also choose the language of the phone interface as well as some network settings. For example, you can enable or disable the PC Port, define your VLANs and configure the multicast paging from the provisioning tab.

Other phone behaviour settings are the ringtones of the phone for direct calls, as well as for queue calls, backlight settings and screensavers, and you can also choose the desired behaviour for your BLFs, to either perform an attended or blind transfer.

Clicking OK will complete the configuration. A few seconds later, the IP Phone will reprovision, and some phones may even reboot. Once it comes back online, it will have all the settings required and will be ready to make and receive calls.

[SLIDE 8]

BLF Keys can also be configured on the PBX, and if the IP Phone being used supports BLF, the user will be able to use these.

BLF means Busy Lamp Field. This basically allows you to monitor the call state of an extension. A BLF on an IP Phone will NOT monitor the profile status of an extension, just the call state. If you configure a BLF on the 3CX App for Windows however, it will monitor both the call state AND the profile status of an extension.

The different call states which can be monitored are:

Idle. The monitored extension is idle and not in a call

Ringing. The monitored extension is in the ringing state.

In Call. The monitored extension is in an active call at the moment.

The way in which each phone will display the BLF, for example the flashing speed and colour, may differ from model to model.

BLF keys can also be used for a variety of other functions.

Apart from monitoring the extension, you can press a BLF which is in the Ringing state to pickup a ringing call of the extension which you are monitoring.

Also, transferring a call to the monitored extension is possible with just a press of the BLF button. You can also dial this extension by just pressing the BLF button.

[SLIDE 9]

A BLF key can also be programmed to perform a variety of other functionalities. In addition to monitoring an extension, you can program a BLF key in the following ways:

As mentioned a few slides back, you can program a BLF to change the profile status of an extension. Each profile will have its own BLF key.

When an extension is a member of a queue, it can log in and out of the queues. An agent will be able to press a BLF to log in to a queue and another BLF to log out of a queue.

There are some cases where you might not want to monitor an extension, but will just need a speed dial button, to dial this extension quickly and easily. Configuring a Speed Dial button will achieve this.

The PBX also provides the capability to create a custom speed dial, where you will be able to add speed dial buttons for numbers which are outside of the corporation, for example, a home phone number, a supplier or customer.

BLF keys can also be configured as Shared Parking slots, allowing you to park calls. When a call is parked in the shared parking slots, it will light up the BLF key on all extensions configured with this Shared Parking slot configured, allowing the person who parked the call or any other extension with the same shared parking slot configured, to see the parked call and pick it up. A total of 250 Shared Parking slots can be configured.

[SLIDE 10]

Once an IP phone has been provisioned, an important aspect is ensuring that it is running the firmware 3CX recommends for your make and model. The firmware versions we recommend have been extensively tested and have been proven to be 100% compatible with 3CX.

Once it is provisioned, upgrading the Firmware to the recommended version can be done through the Management Console.

Some vendors even have multiple firmware versions available, and if this is the case, the PBX will present both the versions for you to choose.

[SLIDE 11]

An important feature of 3CX is the ability to centrally manage firmware files and deploy them network wide. This greatly reduces admin time and helps to increase your network's security by avoiding running outdated firmware.

In order to manage the Firmware of one, or more, of your now registered IP phones, log into the Management Console and then go to Phones page of the Management Console. The firmware files of all provisioned phones will be have already been downloaded automatically to the PBX.

The PBX will perform a comparison of the downloaded firmware files, and what each phone is using, and any phones that are running an older version will be marked in Red.

If this is the case, all you need to do is highlight each phone, press the “Firmware” button and then press OK to confirm the firmware upgrade after verifying the phones which are going to be upgraded.

Once you do this, seconds later the phones will reboot and install the new recommended firmware version.

[SLIDE 12]

So far, we have discussed how to provision an IP Phone as well as managing its firmware.

Next, we will cover CTI. CTI, or Computer Telephony Integration, allows us to remote control an IP Phone from a Windows PC through the 3CX App, or from any browser, in any operating system, using the 3CX Web Client.

This means that from our 3CX App or Web Client, we can trigger actions like making a call, putting calls on hold, transferring calls, answering calls and even escalate a call into a conference, and all of this, with just a mouse click or two.

This feature enables a user to very quickly and easily dial numbers they find in the Company Phonebook, from a Web Page, an Email or even a CRM System.

How many times have you wanted to dial a number you have found on a website, on a phone, and have failed a few times before getting it right? With CTI, all you would have to do is copy-paste it into your 3CX Web Client, then press enter and it will immediately initiate the call on your deskphone.

[SLIDE 13]

In order for Remote Control to work with uaCSTA, the 3CX Web Client must be logged in to the same extension as your IP Phone, which is running the latest firmware to support this new type of remote control.

uaCSTA stands for “User Agent Computer Supported Telecommunications Applications”.

The latest 3CX Apps can also be controlled from the Web Client.

[SLIDE 14]

Log in to the extension via your web browser. Login credentials and instructions can be found in the Welcome Email. This is covered in the 3CX Web Client module.

You can optionally select the SIP device to control, especially if you have multiple devices connected to the same extension, via SIP forking.

Enter or dial the number and then manage the call, just like you would with your 3CX Apps.

[SLIDE 15]

With the 3CX Web Client, answering, diverting, ending or managing a call is just as simple as we’ve grown to love with the 3CX Apps.

[SLIDE 16]

To use the 3CX ClickToCall with Chrome, the latest chrome extension from 3CX will need to be installed. This is easily done from the top right hand menu.

Restart your browser and login again. The necessary settings will be retrieved automatically from the PBX. It's as simple as that!

[SLIDE 17]

3CX ClickToCall is also available for users using Firefox.

To install the Firefox latest plugin, first log into the Web Client. Then, in a new tab, find the 3CX Click to Call plugin in the Firefox Add-on Manager and install it.

All settings will be retrieved automatically. You will need to add the Web Clients URL in order to reference and use the web client.

[SLIDE 18]

From any website, you should now be able to see any phone numbers underlined. Clicking on these numbers, will automatically paste the number into the 3CX Web Client. You can edit the number before dialling, or just press “Call” to dial this number.

Numbers which are defined with the TEL protocol are also able to be dialled on an IP Phone via the Web Client as well.

[SLIDE 19]

For the demonstration of this module, we will provision a few phones on our 3CX System. We will update the firmware of one of these phones. We will then connect to our Web Client with one of the extensions credentials to be able to control it via remote control.

5-Configuring the firewall

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiYn8Vky39o&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=6&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. In this module, we’ll be explaining what configuration your firewall will require.

[SLIDE 2]

Specifically what we are going to be covering are the concepts of NAT and Port preservation, what SIP ALG is and how it works.

Moving forward we will be talking about what firewall configuration is required in order for VoIP Providers to work properly, what Remote Extensions require depending on if they are 3CX Clients or IP Phones, as well as other 3CX PBXs connected via bridges.

Generally, everything you need to know on this topic depending on your use case.

Finally, we will be showing you how you can validate if the configuration has been done correctly, or not.

[SLIDE 3]

As you all probably know, and hope, by default, Firewalls block all incoming traffic from the Internet.

This, however, would not allow the 3CX Server to have a proper two-way communication with external entities such as VoIP Providers and Remote Extensions.

For this reason, some configuration is required so that the Firewall allows all the necessary internet traffic to reach the 3CX Server from the outside.

[SLIDE 4]

In order to fully understand this module, fundamental knowledge of networks and routing is required, however we will try to explain things in the simplest way possible.

If you want to try this out, you will need to have a configurable firewall.

Throughout this module we are going to be talking about the general configuration that needs to be done, but we are not going to go into vendor-specific settings. For this reason, you must know how to perform these settings on the hardware you are using. For the same reason, no one from the 3CX staff will ever attempt to configure your firewall for you.

We do have some sample configuration guides available as a reference, for some of the more popular Firewalls on the market which you can find from our website at the link shown on screen now.

[SLIDE 5]

One of the most important features of a Firewall, which we are going to be talking about, is NAT, or Network Address Translation. This is the way the firewall knows which traffic to allow through, from the outside, into the network.

This is required so that external entities like your SIP Trunks, 3CX Clients, IP Phones in a STUN environment, SBCs and Bridges, can communicate with your 3CX Server from outside your Local LAN.

NAT can also be used to set specific rules so that you can limit who can access the 3CX Server through what is called an ACL, or Access Control List. Many firewalls require separate configuration of the Access Control List, in addition to the NAT configuration. Some firewalls automatically create these rules when the NAT configuration is done. This depends on firewall, and as each firewall is different, consult the documentation of your firewall for the proper procedure to do so.

IPv6 is supported in 3CX, but IPv6 masquerading is not supported. You will need to create IPv6 firewall rules for all the traffic to and from the PBX, just like in IPv4, if IPv6 is being used. The ports will remain the same as in IPv4.

[SLIDE 6]

One more feature a Firewall must have, is to be able to support Full Cone NAT.

This allows entities unknown to the Firewall to be able to contact the 3CX Server. This is especially important for VoIP Providers, as most of the times, they will try to contact your server from a large range of IPs and not just one.

This is also important for remote extensions as the users may not have a static IP at home or if they are connecting on the go. Especially when travelling, a user does not need to communicate with the network admin beforehand to allow an IP into the network. Mobile workers do not even need to know their IP Address. The firewall should allow access from anywhere, on the specific ports, which we will cover shortly.

[SLIDE 7]

Another important characteristic a Firewall must have, is Port Preservation. What this means is that when an internal entity sends a packet through the firewall, the Firewall must allow this through WITHOUT changing the source port.

Although this may sound like an obvious thing, a lot of Firewall have features like “Source Port Remap” which does exactly this, purposely change the Source IP Port.

This is usually not a problem for other protocols, but SIP and SDP are kind of unique in this sense. To get a bit more technical on this, a lot of other protocols rely on the source port that is found in the Transport Header, so if this is changed by the firewall that is OK. SIP on the other hand also has port information inside the actual payload, and this port information must match that found in the Transport Header. If they do not match, there is a high probability that there will be connectivity issues.

[SLIDE 8]

SIP ALG is one more feature a lot of Firewalls have.

What it does is try to look inside the SIP packets and alter the information. Although the intention of SIP ALG is good and it tries to solve some connectivity issues, our experience has shown that unfortunately not all implementations of it work reliably.

For this reason, we recommend disabling it.

Doing this can sometimes be a bit tricky and there is no consistent pattern to how this is done, and does vary from one Firewall vendor to another. If you are unsure how this feature is disabled, it is best to either contact the firewall manufacturer or look it up, in the online documentation they may provide.

[SLIDE 9]

Now we will talk a bit more specifically about exactly which NAT ports need to be opened, depending on what External VoIP traffic you are going to be utilizing.

Most of the ports we will mention in this module, as well as other modules, can be changed during the installation process. We will always be mentioning the default ports in this case. If you change any of the ports during the installation phase, you will need to modify and perform the necessary port forwarding to reflect this.

SIP trunks are used in most of the deployments these days, so we will start with this. To use SIP Trunks you must open, and forward the SIP port of the PBX. This, by default is port 5060 for both TCP and UDP traffic, although this can be changed during the installation phase.

This will allow the SIP signaling from your Provider to reach 3CX. SIP Signaling, however, does not contain the actual audio. Audio uses a different Protocol called RTP, or Real-time Transport Protocol, which uses a different port range. This means that you must also open this port range for UDP traffic. This range is set from 9000 to 10999, and cannot be changed.

[SLIDE 10]

If you intend on having remote users working with either a 3CX Client, an IP Phone operating through an SBC, or even another PBX connected via a bridge, then the port you will need to open is the tunnel port of the PBX, which, by default is 5090 for both TCP and UDP traffic, unless changed during the installation process.

The Tunnel protocol port encapsulates both SIP and Audio packets so only one port is required for calls to be made.

Because the endpoints may also receive other non-SIP information such as Presence Information, Provisioning Information and the Company Phonebook, one more port must be opened. That is the HTTPS port you chose during the installation process which, by default, is 5001, and is TCP traffic.

[SLIDE 11]

WebMeeting is another great feature 3CX offers. In order to use this, you must allow outbound traffic to the WebMeeting server which is webmeeting.3cx.net on port 443. This is irrespective of which HTTPS port is defined on the PBX.

Most firewalls allow outbound traffic without any restrictions. However, some corporate firewalls restrict outgoing traffic as well, so this traffic to the webmeeting portal server will need to be allowed specifically.

In order for notifications to reach your 3CX Server from the Web Meeting server, you must ensure that your PBX HTTPS port is open for TCP traffic.

Only do this configuration in the case where your firewall does restrict outgoing traffic to only the configured destinations.

[SLIDE 12]

External IP Phones can be connected through an SBC to the 3CX Server, but they can also be connected directly.

In this case, the ports that need to be opened and forwarded are very similar to those required for a VoIP Provider.

The PBX SIP Port must be forwarded for TCP and UDP traffic, as well as the audio ports for UDP traffic. In addition to those, the HTTPS port will need to be opened for TCP traffic, which will allow the IP Phone to retrieve information like the Provisioning file and the Phonebook.

[SLIDE 13]

During the setup of the PBX, using the PBXConfigTool, using a browser, port 5015 will be used with TCP traffic. If you are performing this task from a remote network, you will need to have this port forwarded to the PBX. This is only required for the duration of the host setup, and will not be used during the actual everyday use of the PBX. HTTP is used in this case, as an SSL certificate has not been created just yet.

[SLIDE 14]

Once you have done your firewall configuration, it is now time to run the Firewall Checker.

What this does is check if the ports have indeed been opened and provides a status.

Green means that the port has been successfully opened, or

Red means that the port has not been opened, in which case you must check your firewall configuration again.

To run the Firewall Checker log into your Management Console and in the Dashboard select the Firewall option.

It is worth pointing out that only UDP ports are checked.

This means that it cannot check the SIP, Tunnel and HTTPS port TCP traffic.

The firewall checker will stop the PBX services to perform the tests, and restart them automatically when it finishes. Please be careful when performing this test on a live system, as the calls will be dropped.

[SLIDE 15]

Here you can see an example of the Firewall Checker, which was run on a system that seems to fail all of the tests. This is clearly stated in the results.

[SLIDE 16]

This means that either the firewall has not been configured at all, or the configuration has been done incorrectly.

In this case, if you do not know how to proceed, you should contact the Support Team of your Firewall manufacturer so that they can help you with the procedure to open the ports needed, properly.

As this may require special knowledge of your Firewall device, the 3CX Support Team will not be able to help you with this process. Also there is no point in troubleshooting any issues related to VoIP Providers or Remote Extensions just yet.

The issue is an incorrect configuration of the firewall. Once you get the firewall configured correctly and the firewall checker passes, then see if your issue remains.

Now, if this is a new installation, there is no reason proceeding with creating and provisioning VoIP Providers, Bridges or Remote Extensions until the failed Firewall Checker has passed.

[SLIDE 17]

This is another example of a Firewall Checker result.

This is not a complete fail like before, but it is neither a complete success.

As we can see, here the SIP Server port, 5060 and Tunneling Proxy port, 5090 have passed while all others failed. This is still considered a failed Firewall Check, but we are on the right track!

[SLIDE 18]

The same procedure applies as before. Talk with your firewall manufacturer if you require assistance in the configuration before proceeding any further.

[SLIDE 19]

This is what a successful Firewall Checker result looks like.

[SLIDE 20]

So what has been checked in the firewall checker?

Full Cone NAT has been successfully configured and Port Preservation is correct.

SIP ALG has also been tested by the Firewall checker and has not been detected, so it is considered to be disabled.

Also, remember that we mentioned that the ports are not checked for TCP, so please ensure the ports that require TCP have been opened correctly.

You can now start configuring the PBX to accept connections from the outside world.

[SLIDE 21]

The SIP ALG test is integrated in the firewall test. If it is disabled, it will give a Green result.

If it is enabled and detected, it will give a failed result. You will need to configure your firewall to disable this.

[SLIDE 22]

I will now show you what a successful firewall check looks like, and what a failed firewall check looks like. During the installation of a windows machine, the built-in Windows firewall is configured with the ports selected.

I will show you the different behaviour when the ports are both open and closed.

6-Configuring VoIP Providers / SIP Trunks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-eb2ZlqnC8&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=7&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series from 3CX. In this module we will be explaining how to use a SIP Trunk in your 3CX installation.

[SLIDE 2]

To start off we will be discussing the Prerequisites and what is required in order to successfully connect to the PSTN.

Then we will move on and explain the 2 types of Providers which are available.

We will also discuss what a SIP Trunk is, how to implement it in the Management Console, how to configure Inbound Rules, Outbound Rules and also how you can manipulate the Caller ID that users will present, when making outgoing calls.

Finishing off, the routing of Emergency Numbers will be discussed.

[SLIDE 3]

What you will need in order to do what is explained in this module is quite simple.

First you will need an account from one of our supported VoIP providers. You can find a list of all our supported providers at the link shown on your screen right now.

Also, as we are going to be setting up a VoIP Provider, you must make sure that you have configured your firewall accordingly and that the Firewall Checker passes. More information about firewall configuration can be found in the Firewall Configuration Module.

[SLIDE 4]

We recommend that you use a supported VoIP Provider as they have been tested with 3CX. All supported providers have passed 3CX’s InterOperability Test, or IOT as we call it, which means the provider’s infrastructure is 100% compatible with our software and they have also committed to jointly support the solution.

We have made a template which auto configures the supported trunk for 3CX, and should any issue occur, our Support Team will be able to assist you.

The ability to process faxes through the T.38 protocol is not a compulsory requirement for the provider to be considered supported.

You do, however, have the option of also using a non-Supported provider, and assuming they comply with RFC 3261, they should work.

Note that if you choose to go down this route, 3CX will not offer support, and we cannot guarantee the smooth operation nor do we provide a template. This means that you may have to do some manual configuration within the SIP Trunk settings to get everything to work correctly.

This requires SIP knowledge and time. If you wish to use a particular unsupported provider we recommend you ask them to apply for the 3CX IOT.

[SLIDE 5]

What is a SIP Trunk though?

SIP Trunks nowadays have become a standard in the telecommunications world. They offer an alternative way of getting access to the PSTN, but rather than using the old analogue network, they operate over an existing internet line.

No additional hardware is required, although some providers’ infrastructure requires the use of an onsite box.

And, you have the option of getting international numbers terminating on your PBX. This enables you to pay local rates for outbound calls and save your international customers money when calling you from abroad.

[SLIDE 6]

In order to add a Supported SIP Trunk to your 3CX installation, first log into your Management console and go to the “SIP Trunks” page on the left, then press the “Add SIP Trunk” button.

From the list that is presented, select your country and then select the Supported Provider you have an account with.

Finally set the main trunk number as it has been given to you by the Provider. This will act as a catch all for any non configured DIDs.

[SLIDE 7]

Speaking of DIDs, with SIP Trunks, apart from your Main number, you can also get additional numbers that are associated with the main number you already have.

These are called DIDs, or Direct Inward Dial numbers.

DIDs provide your Callers with additional numbers they can dial to reach your system. This enables 3CX to route incoming calls differently, depending on which number was dialed by the Caller.

You can route calls to any of your Extensions, to queues, to other external numbers or even to the built-in Fax Server.

You can change the routing of inbound calls depending on what time of the day it is, or even based on whether it is a public holiday or a weekend.

[SLIDE 8]

So far we have shown you how to create a SIP Trunk and we have talked about what DIDs are.

Now we are going to show you how to associate your DIDs with your SIP Trunk in 3CX.

Open the Management Console and go to SIP Trunks, highlight your SIP Trunk, press “Edit” and go to the “DIDs” tab.

Now click “Add” to add your DID numbers. Don’t write the whole number. Instead, use the * character as a wildcard, followed by the last 6 digits, at least, of each DID.

This will ignore all numbers before the last 6 digits of the DID. We do this so the PBX can recognise the DID in whatever format the provider may be sending it. Sometimes the DID will be sent from the provider in E164 format. Sometimes it may be in international format, or even in local format. With the wildcard, the PBX will ignore the beginning on the number and focus on the last 6 digits only.

Just a note, that the wildcard should only be used when configuring DIDs, and not the main trunk number.

[SLIDE 9]

Now that we have created our SIP Trunk, and associated any DID numbers we have with it, it is time to configure how the incoming calls will be routed.

To do this, in the Management Console, go to Inbound Rules and press “Add DID Rule”. At this point you will be prompted to fill in some fields.

First, the Name of the Inbound Rule. This is useful, because whenever a user of the system receives a call, they see this name on the display of their device. This way they will know which Inbound Rule was used, and answer the call accordingly. It is, however, optional to add the name, but does help, especially when an extension is assigned various DIDs.

Then, from the DID/DDI drop-down menu, select which DID number that will be used for this rule. These are taken from the DIDs tabs of the SIP Trunks created on the PBX. Only unassigned DIDs will show here. This will also automatically link this to the relevant SIP Trunk.

Finally, choose where the call is going to be routed to during in office and out of office hours, and press OK.

[SLIDE 10]

The next thing we will walk you through is how to make outbound calls using your newly created SIP Trunk.

To do this you must create Outbound Rules. Outbound Rules give the administrator a way to control how a call will be routed. This can be done based on the dialed number, the extension trying to make the call, the extension group the dialing extension is in, or even the length of the dialed number.

[SLIDE 11]

In this module we will not expand on all the Outbound Rule Options and capabilities. This is covered in the Advanced Outbound Routing module. For now, we will show you how to create a single Outbound Rule that will allow every user of the system to use the SIP Trunk.

Go to the “Outbound Rules” page on the left hand menu of the Management Console, and press the “Add” button.

First, set a name for your Outbound Rule. Unlike the Inbound Rules, the name for the Outbound Rules is mandatory. Also, make sure that the name is descriptive, as it does assist the admin in troubleshooting. Then, in the “Calls to numbers starting with prefix” criterion field, enter “0-9,+”. Essentially, with this, we are telling 3CX to allow any calls starting with any dialed number or the + character.

[SLIDE 12]

After the criteria of the outbound rules have been matched, we must tell 3CX which Trunk to use in order to make the call. This is done by setting Route 1 to the Provider we want.

Once we press OK, the Outbound Rule will be created and any user on our system will be able to make outbound calls through the trunk we specified.

If the provider in the 1st route is busy, or not available, the PBX will attempt to process the call using the subsequent routes.

[SLIDE 13]

Emergency numbers are the telephone numbers for the Police, Ambulance or Fire Department. Usually the emergency numbers are 3 digit numbers, which may overlap with the extension numbering if your system is configured with 3 digit extensions.

During the deployment of the PBX, you will need to identify the emergency numbers which will be used. Avoid configuring extensions with these numbers. Common emergency numbers are: 112 in Europe, 911 in the United States, 999 in the United kingdom and 000 in Australia.

Emergency numbers are configured from within the PBX General settings. This will define a default outbound rule, which will be defined as the entire emergency number being the prefix.

Calls to emergency numbers can also be limited to particular extensions or extension groups, and this is configured within the emergency number settings.

Calls to emergency numbers can bypass the license restriction temporarily, to allow the call to go through without hindrance.

[SLIDE 14]

Moving on to the Outbound Caller ID. The Caller ID is the number the PBX sends out to the PSTN and the receiver of a call sees on their display.

3CX offers 2 ways of manipulating the Caller ID.

The first way is to configure 1 Caller ID that will be used from all extensions when making an Outbound Call.

To configure this, go to your SIP Trunk and Edit the trunk.

Go to the “Caller ID” tab, and in the “Outbound Caller ID” field enter the Caller ID you want to present.

Alternatively, you can configure the system so that each Extension has a different Caller ID when calling out.

To do this, go to the “Extensions” page, highlight an extension you want to set the Caller ID and press “Edit”. Then, in the “General” tab set the Caller ID you want this extension to present when calling out.

You will also need to define this in the Outbound Parameters of the SIP Trunk, so the PBX knows which of the two values to use.

[SLIDE 15]

The Caller ID number you enter will usually need to have a specific format. This format can vary from one Provider to another, so we would recommend speaking to your Provider, and asking them what their infrastructure requires, or look in their documentation provided to you when registering for their service.

Here you can see some of the most common formats providers expect, but we have added spaces for emphasis. Do not add spaces or dashes when defining Caller IDs.

[SLIDE 16]

Finally, the last topic we are going to be covering in today’s module is how to recognize some of the more common issues related to SIP Trunks.

If you ever notice that incoming or outgoing calls work, but drop after about 32 seconds or that there is one way audio, specifically when the External Party can hear a user of the system, but the user of the system cannot hear the External Party, this most likely means that your Firewall has not been correctly configured, so double-check that the Firewall Checker has passed and that SIP ALG has been disabled.

Also check if your Public IP has changed from that which you had entered during the initial setup of the system. An incorrect public IP will cause the provider to attempt communication with the wrong public IP. As the PBX will not be receiving any communications with the provider, it will drop the call.

[SLIDE 17]

I will now demonstrate the material we have covered in this module. We will create a SIP Trunk, create an Inbound and Outbound rule, and make a few calls in and out, from and to the SIP Trunk. We will also configure an emergency number.

7-Voicemail

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRkdJJAi3gw&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=8&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series of 3CX. In this module, we will cover the voicemail functionality of 3CX.

[SLIDE 2]

The voicemail functionality is so ubiquitous with a PBX, that a lot of people take it for granted. Especially as is available for free, with every edition of 3CX. However, there are multiple voicemail capabilities which are really handy, and we will see each one of the capabilities listed here. We will finish the module with the security of the voicemail as well as some tips for backing up the voicemails of the users.

[SLIDE 3]

Unlike other vendors, where voicemail is an added feature, 3CX provides a voicemail box for each of the extensions in the PBX, across all editions and irrespective of the size of license.

A voicemail box can have a different language than the default system prompt language, allowing you to have a truly multilingual PBX, where each extension can have a different prompt language. This requires the relevant prompt sets to be downloaded to the PBX to enable the language in the drop down dox.

The Voicemail System can also be configured to make outgoing calls from the PBX. This can be used by extension users who do not have a smartphone to install the 3CX client, or do not have a data connection available due to remoteness or even running out of data. All you need to do is point a DID to the main voicemail extension. This will then prompt callers for an extension number and voicemail PIN number. Once authenticated, the caller will need to go into the options of the voicemail, by pressing 9, and then choosing option number 3.

From within the voicemail options it is also possible to change the profile state as well. This would be option number 1. All the caller needs to do, is follow the prompts.

[SLIDE 4]

When you receive a voicemail, there are various ways to get notified of an incoming voicemail. The most traditional way is to see the Message Waiting Indicator on the phones. A flashing light is always a good way to get someone's attention, but not all phones will flash. Some just light up the indicator and keep it on. This will differ between makes and models of phones.

In addition to the Message Waiting Indicator, 3CX is in a position to also send an email notification to the extension’s user. This could only contain the notification, but it may also contain the voicemail as an attached WAV file. There is also the option of deleting the voicemail file from the PBX after sending it as an email attachment. This option assumes that a valid email address is assigned to the extension, and a valid SMTP server is defined on the PBX.

With the 3CX apps and web client, it is possible to also see the list of voicemails received in one easy to read interface. From these interfaces it is also possible to manage the voicemails, which allows you to mark them as heard or unheard and even delete them from the PBX, assuming the email sending notification option is not set to delete them.

[SLIDE 5]

While there is a default greeting for each of the available languages configured on the voicemail of the extensions, it is possible to customise this and record your own prompt.

A lot of companies may have their own professionally recorded prompts added to the voicemail system as a greeting prompt, or record one directly from one of the provisioned phones. This will allow for a more personalised greeting and can make the person more comfortable when they hear a familiar voice, rather than a generic prompt voice.

When a greeting is recorded, you can assign it to either all of the extension profiles, or have a different greeting for each of the 5 different profiles available for an extension. The extension profiles are covered in more detail, in the Forwarding Rules module.

When recording prompts in other languages, some admins or users may enter the filename using non standard characters, for example with accents. The system will not accept such characters.

[SLIDE 6]

When a voicemail is received, sometimes it can be short and precise and just a few seconds long. However, some can get quite long winded and this will take up a lot of the perons time to go through all the voicemails which have been left, especially when the user has been away for an extended period of time.

It's now easy to sift through the voicemails using the voicemail transcription functionality.

Using a 3rd party API, namely Google’s Speech API, we are able to have a transcript of the WAV file. This provides an easy way of seeing the content of each of the voicemail messages, through the email notification and the 3CX Web client. This way you wont need to listen to each and every message to see which are the important ones.

Voicemail transcription requires a Professional or Enterprise Edition 3CX license to be active on the PBX, and it is a feature which is enabled globally for all extensions.

Some configuration is necessary on Google’s Cloud Platform as well as the PBX in the form of creating an API key on the Google Cloud platform, and copying this over to 3CX, in order to allow proper communication between the two.

There is a limitation on this, namely that only the 1st minute of the voicemail will be transcribed.

[SLIDE 7]

Being WAV files, the voicemail files can take up a significant amount of space on the server hard drive.

A quota for voicemail usage can be assigned in order to limit the amount of disk space is used by the voicemail files. When the quota is assigned, the admin will want to be notified when the quota is nearings its use. An email can be sent to the admin when the quota is nearing its full use and the percentage of quota can be configured to trigger the sending of the email.

Sometimes people listen to their voicemails but never delete the old ones. If you don't configure the voicemails to be deleted from the server immediately after being sent to the user via email, you can configure the server to delete old voicemails older than a specified number of days.

[SLIDE 8]

Security is something which is on everybody's mind these days, or at least it should! The voicemail functionality can be secured to make sure it isn't used as a way into the PBX.

When voicemail is not needed, it should be disabled on certain extensions. This could include phones in common use areas, like reception areas, kitchens, etc. This will prevent people from using functionalities within the voicemail system, like dialling external calls.

Authentication to the voicemail system can also be disabled in some cases, where you will just need to call the voicemail extension to receive messages from the phones provisioned on the specific extension, without entering a PIN number. Calling to the voicemail system from another extension, or from outside, via a DID will still require authentication with the PIN Number.

If you are in a secure environment, like a hotel room, where not everyone has access, voicemail authentication may not required in such cases. In this particular example, it will make access to Voicemail easy for the hotel guest.

When PIN authentication is required, there is a hard coded limit to how many times a PIN number can be entered incorrectly. This is set to 3 failed attempts, after which access to the voicemail system will be blocked for a period of 2 minutes.

PIN Numbers by default are 4 digit numerals but can be increased to 10 digits for increased security.

The ability to make outgoing calls from the Voicemail menu is disabled by default and will need to be specifically enabled from the General Settings of the PBX to allow this functionality to work.

[SLIDE 9]

Back ups are very important in any system, and provide peace of mind to the admin.

The backups of 3CX are so easy to perform that there is absolutely no excuse for not having a backup of your PBX.The voicemail files are not backed up by default, so you will need to specifically choose the “Voicemails” option in the Backup and Restore page in order to backup the voicemail WAV files.

As the WAV files will take up a significant amount of space in the backup file, you can choose the email option to send the WAV file as an attachment in the voicemail notification, and then to delete it off the server. This will basically offload the WAV file to the email server and email clients, keeping the backup file size smaller than what it would be, when this option is selected.

Backups are covered in more detail in the Backup and Restore module, in the intermediate training course.

[SLIDE 10]

For the demonstration that follows we will configure a voicemail prompt for an extension and we will also configure the voicemail transcription in the settings of 3CX.

8-Digital Receptionist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_Piynvf-K0&list=PL6sq0_ucoDulZC7S4znK9ZrGq1Is7BYFA&index=9&t=0s

[SLIDE 1]

Welcome to the online training series of 3CX. In this module we will be covering the Digital Receptionists.

[SLIDE 2]

In today’s training we will cover the different types of Digital Receptionists which are available, the menu options available in a Digital Receptionist, as well as the ability to direct dial an extension from within the Digital Receptionist.

[SLIDE 3]

Whenever we hear the word receptionist, we always think of a person sitting at the front office of a company, greeting people and answering the phones. They will divert the calls to the appropriate department, or staff member, depending on who the caller asked for.

A Digital Receptionist will perform the same functionality, but will provide the caller with a list of possible options. It will prompt the caller for input from the keypad, in order to be able to process the call.

The options available are predefined and will need to be recorded as a voice prompt and configured in the PBX.

It is also possible to dial any local extension from within the Digital Receptionist.

The audio format of the voice prompt will need to be in the 3CX supported audio format. This can be uploaded in the supported format. The format is a WAV file, encoded as PCM, 8 kHz, 16 bit, MONO.

A recording can also be recorded from a phone provisioned on the PBX. If you record from one of the PBX provisioned phones, the audio will be in the supported format.

[SLIDE 4]

3CX provides five different types of digital receptionists.

The Standard Digital receptionists are the type of digital receptionists that we have grown used to all these years, with options available from 0-9 and the ability to direct dial an extension. The different menu options available will need to be recorded into the intro prompt of the Digital Receptionist.

A DTMF digital receptionist will allow you to define more DTMF options in the menu, giving a more detailed menu structure to the caller. Custom DTMF inputs can be created, which will allow the caller to choose from a wider variety of options, and not just the default 10 options.

Script digital receptionists allow you to take your menus to a whole new level. Based on the inputs from the caller, various actions, via scripts can be triggered to allow for more complex call routings.

Wake up digital receptionists allow a hotel guest, or normal extension use to dial the Wake Up digital receptionist and schedule their own wake up or reminder call. Only one of this type of digital receptionist can be created per PBX.

The final type of digital receptionist available is the option to hand off to MS Exchange, where all the IVR functionality is handled entirely by the Exchange Server.

[SLIDE 5]

From the Management Console, select Digital Receptionist from the left hand menu, and click “Add”

Give the Digital Receptionist a name. Choose a descriptive name as this name will possibly be used for routing calls from other Digital Receptionists. Having multiple Digital Receptionists can get confusing, so good descriptive names help to simplify the process.

Then select the type of digital receptionist. Depending of the type of digital receptionist chosen, different menu and configuration options will be shown.

Choose whether to import a pre-recorded prompt, or you can opt to record a prompt from one of the phones. This is the audio prompt which will be played to the callers, informing them of their options.

You can choose a different language than the default system prompt language. This will override the default system prompt language for the rest of the specific call. All other calls which do not pass through this Digital Receptionist will continue to use the default system prompt language.

[SLIDE 6]

The options which are available to the callers are the following:

Connect to Extensions. This will give you the list of extensions on the PBX which can be chosen to transfer the call to.

Connect to Ring Group. This will give the list of all available Ring Groups in the PBX.

Connect to Queue. This will give the list of all available Call Queues in the PBX.

Connect to Digital Receptionist. This will allow you to create multi level Digital Receptionists. For example, you may have the 1st Digital Receptionist as the choice of language in a PBX. The choices for each language will then go to a 2nd level of Digital Receptionist which will allow the caller to choose the department they wish to speak to, with the system prompts in the chosen language.

This will not affect the recorded prompt, as this will be in any language you record it.

When creating complex digital receptionists, please keep them as complex as is absolutely required, as the callers may get either confused or bored and hang up the call. A list of all available digital receptionists will be shown.

Transfer to Voicemail. This will allow you to transfer a call to the voicemail box of an extension in the PBX. The caller will then be directed to leave a voicemail in the voicemail box of this extension.

Nothing. The PBX will continue to wait and will not respond to a key press.

Repeat Prompt. The intro prompt will be repeated from the beginning, informing the caller of their options.

Play prompt and exit. This option will play a pre-configured prompt and exit the digital receptionist. This will not transfer the call to another location.

[SLIDE 7]

Another option, which was shown in the screenshot of the previous slide but was not mentioned, is the “Call by Name” feature. This feature provides the caller with the option to call an extension, even if they do not know the extension number.

The dialing is done based on the configured last name of the extension. The caller will be prompted to enter the 1st 3 digits of the last name of the person they wish to contact.

This provides small companies, without DIDs, to have smart dialling capabilities, where they will be able to be contacted directly, without needing to go through a receptionist.

To enable the Call by Name feature to dial an extension, you will need to record Self Identification Prompts via the voicemail menu of an extension. The user will be able to record their name, to be used in the identification of the extension in the call by name menu.

The Self Identification Prompt will only play when there is more than one match for the 3 digit number the caller entered.

For example:

David Smith and Wayne Rogers both have surnames that can be accessed by dialing 764. In this particular case, their Self Identification Prompts will be read out and the caller will be prompted to select which person they need to speak to.

The Call by Name functionality has a limitation of 10 users, as the options to speak to a person are 0 to 9.

[SLIDE 8]

A caller can also dial an extension at any time within a Digital Receptionist. A menu option is not required.

This requires a Standard Type digital receptionist to be configured. There is an interdigit timeout of 2 seconds, so the caller will need to enter the extension digits within 2 seconds, otherwise the Digital Receptionist might consider this to be an invalid option, or an option of the Digital Receptionist.

Sometimes this functionality is not required on a system, so if you do not want a caller dialling extensions at random, you can choose any other type of digital receptionist, other than Standard, where this functionality is not active.

This functionality can be disabled globally across all Digital Receptionists, as some companies do not wish people to call in and start dialling extensions indiscriminately. Contacting 3CX Technical Support, you will be able to ask for the procedure to disable this functionality.

[SLIDE 9]

After the Digital Receptionist prompt is read out, the PBX will wait for the configured options to be entered. If no input is detected after the configured timeout, the PBX will forward the call based on the configuration. The normal menu options are available in this case, except for the “Play Prompt and Exit” option, as mentioned in Slide 5.

When an invalid option is entered, for example someone tries to dial an extension from the direct dialing functionality, and dials an invalid extension, the PBX provides the option to transfer to either an Extension, a Ring Group, another Digital Receptionist, or, to repeat the prompt.

[SLIDE 10]

The Holiday Digital receptionist, is a predefined digital receptionist, that is triggered automatically on global holidays, if you have the holiday configuration done according to the information provided in the intermediate course, in the Time Based Scheduling module.

The menu options available for the holiday digital receptionist are the same as any digital receptionist defined in the PBX. You can define the HOL Digital Receptionist to be any type of Digital Receptionist.

During a holiday, two different call flows are available:

The first is when a holiday prompt is defined in the PBX Holiday settings. When defining a holiday, if a holiday prompt is defined, this prompt will be played, and when the call is transferred to the holiday digital receptionist, the prompt for this digital receptionist will not be played, but the options, and timeout will be in force.

If a holiday prompt is not played, then the holiday digital receptionist prompt will be played, and then the options will be triggered.

In summary, only one of the two prompts will be played, with a priority given to the holiday prompt in the PBX Holiday settings.

[SLIDE 11]

In the demonstration of this module, the Call by name functionality will be shown, in a standard type digital receptionist.

QREF/16-15

Topic: Voicemail

The transcribed text of Voicemail Transcription (speech-to-text) is only visible through the 3CX Web Client

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/10-22

Topic: Installing 3CX

The standard protocol port for HTTPS is port TCP:80.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/10-23

Topic: Installing 3CX

The installer sets the OS Timezone accordingly based on what you selected during the Wizard for both Linux and Windows.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/10-17

Topic: Installing 3CX

Have a look at the edition comparison page (https://www.3cx.com/phone-system/edition-comparison/) and answer the following question: You would like to test how two 3CX PBX installations can be bridged together. One license is a "3CX Standard Edition" and the other a "3CX Enterprise Edition". Can these editions be bridged?

  • YES
  • NO

QREF/17-11

Topic: Digital Receptionists

A "Digital Receptionist" can be configured to route calls based on speech input by the caller.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/13-18

Topic: Configuring a Local Desk Telephone

When provisioning BLF keys on an IP Phone, the default action is always to Blind Transfer and cannot be changed.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/13-02

Topic: Configuring a Local Desk Telephone

A supported IP phone can be configured manually by filling in each setting in the web interface of the device one by one. Is the device still covered by 3CX Support when issues occur with the manual configuration?

  • NO
  • YES

QREF/12-11

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

It is mandatory to configure your own PUSH account in order to use the 3CX App for Android.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/12-16

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

Is iOS 10 the minimum version required to install the 3CX App on an iPhone?

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/13-15

Topic: Configuring a Local Desk Telephone

Can I provision more than one IP phone to an extension, even if the vendor and/or the models are different?

  • NO
  • YES

QREF/15-11

Topic: SIP Trunks

When creating inbound rules, can the destination where the incoming call is routed to, be an outside number?

  • YES
  • NO

QREF/12-06

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

A 3CX App can use the same 3CX extension number as a desktop IP phone.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/17-05

Topic: Digital Receptionists

A single Digital Receptionist can handle multiple callers at the same time.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/12-14

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

SIP Forking is a term used when a call is forwarded to another extension when the call is not answered within a certain time frame.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/17-06

Topic: Digital Receptionists

The Digital Receptionist destination is chosen based on the DTMF tone the PBX receives from the caller.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/10-06

Topic: Installing 3CX

If you choose to use a 3CX FQDN, does the configuration wizard generate a trusted SSL certificate for you during the installation?

  • YES
  • NO

QREF/14-08

Topic: Configure the Firewall

In order to be able to run the 3CX Web Configuration Wizard remotely, you must have HTTP port TCP:5015 port forwarded on the Firewall.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/14-03

Topic: Configure the Firewall

Using VoIP Providers only requires that you forward/NAT the SIP port (default 5060 UDP/TCP) on your Firewall.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/12-09

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

If you want to connect to 3CX remotely using the 3CX Apps, you just need to port forward/NAT port 5090 (TCP/UDP) on the firewall in front of the 3CX PBX.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/10-02

Topic: Installing 3CX

Can 3CX be installed, activated and operated without internet access?

  • NO
  • YES

QREF/17-08

Topic: Digital Receptionists

You can upload MP3 files Digital Receptionists to be used as custom prompts.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/12-03

Topic: Installing the 3CX Client

An administrator can provision a 3CX Mobile App for an employee using the QR code found in the Management Console.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/14-12

Topic: Configure the Firewall

Firewalls use NAT to remap IP information when data packages traverse it.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/14-05

Topic: Configure the Firewall

Does the firewall checker check if ports have been altered by a firewall / router when data traverses it?

  • NO
  • YES

QREF/16-20

Topic: Voicemail

The default Voicemail PIN length is 3 digits.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/10-08

Topic: Installing 3CX

The OS Timezone is set automatically on Linux, based on your selection during the Setup Wizard. On Windows it is not set automatically.

  • TRUE
  • FALSE

QREF/10-21

Topic: Installing 3CX

Can the internal IP address of 3CX (the NIC IP Address) be changed without the need to reinstall the PBX?

  • YES
  • NO

QREF/13-08

Topic: Configuring a Local Desk Telephone

The 3CX Web Client cannot remote control a 3CX App.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/17-15

Topic: Digital Receptionists

Digital Receptionists have an option that will repeat the prompt to the caller.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

QREF/16-17

Topic: Voicemail

3CX will send the administrator a notification when the Voicemail disk space quota is being reached.

  • FALSE
  • TRUE

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