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SITHKOP002 Plan and cost menus Assessment

Unit description

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to plan and cost basic menus for dishes or food product ranges for any type of cuisine or food service style. It requires the ability to identify customer preferences, plan menus to meet customer and business needs, cost menus and evaluate their success.

It does not cover the specialist skills used by senior catering managers and chefs to design and cost complex menus after researching market preferences and trends. Those skills are covered in SITHKOP007 Design and cost menus.

TASK a – multiple choice

Instructions:

Each multiple-choice question has four responses.

You are to answer all questions.

There is only one right answer.

  • Which statement most accurately describes a customer profile?

It’s a tool you can use to get feedback from customers regarding their preferences.

It identifies which dishes are most popular with customers so you can retain them on your menu.

It identifies who exactly your most frequent customers are and gives you information about them which helps you analyse their food preferences.

correct

It determines where you locate your business.

  • Why is it important to analyse the food preferences of your customer base?

So you can choose menu items which meet their needs.

Correct

So you can meet health and safety requirements.

So you can tell if your dishes are profitable enough to put on the menu.

So you can adjust the menu based on their feedback.

  • How can you generate new ideas when planning a menu and its dishes?

Select dishes from old menus you have used before.

Discuss recipes and menu options with customers and survey suppliers for ingredient availability.

Cook potential dishes during weekly team meetings and discuss how to vary current dishes.

Look at trade and other magazines, and talk to colleagues and customers

Correct

  • All menu types can be grouped into four broad menu classifications. What are the four menu classifications?

À la carte, degustation, theme, cyclical.

À la carte, table d’hote, banquet, smorgasbord.

Table d’hote, à la carte, function, cyclical.

Correct

Function, cyclical, carte du jour, novelty.

  • What’s the most effective way to analyse customer preferences?

Reviewing customer surveys.

Collating customer satisfaction and complaints sheets.

Doing a stocktake.

Checking the sales data.

Correct

  • What are three important things to keep in mind when planning a menu?

The organisation’s popularity index, sales data and customer surveys.

The organisation’s customer base, service style and cuisine.

Correct

The organisation’s standard measures, butcher’s tests and standard yield tests.

The organisation’s standards of spelling, grammar and punctuation.

  • You must ensure that your menu includes a variety of dishes for the style of service and cuisine. What are two things you can check when assessing variety?

Assess it for culinary and nutritional balance.

Correct

Assess it for cost-effectiveness and profitability.

Assess it for yield and cost of raw ingredients.

Assess it for taste, texture and appearance.

  • What must you itemise to accurately cost a menu?

All ingredients in the dishes or food production items.

All ingredients that yield less than 100%.

All ingredients that yield 100%.

All proposed components of the dishes or food production items.

Correct

  • Which formula would you use to calculate actual food cost from raw ingredients which yield 100%?

Purchase weight ÷ purchase unit × 100 = actual food cost.

Purchase unit cost × usage % = actual food cost.

Correct

EPQ ÷ APQ = actual food cost.

Quantity required ÷ yield % = actual food cost.

  • You have assessed your menu items for cost-effectiveness. Which ones should you choose to place on the menu?

The menu items with low yield.

The menu items with the largest usage percentage.

The menu items with high yield.

Correct

The menu items with the highest food cost percentage.

  • What is your most important goal when pricing menu items?

Ensuring maximum profitability.

Correct

Making sure all menu items have the same food cost percentage.

Preparing and designing a clear and descriptive menu so the dishes and selling price are clear.

Ensuring prices are similar to your competition’s selling prices for similar menu items.

  • Which menu content would appeal to business executives in a fine dining restaurant?

Fish and chips with salad.

Beer-battered barramundi with choice of chips or steamed vegetables.

Indian-style barramundi with cauliflower.

Pan-roasted Daintree barramundi, cauliflower, satay spices, yoghurt and barberries.

Correct

  • Which is the correct name for a style of cuisine?

Fare of the sea.

Hot and spicy.

Rice and grains.

Modern Australian.

Correct

  • Why is it important to use descriptive writing in your menus?

To impress restaurant reviewers with your menu items.

To promote the sale of menu items.

Correct

To fill up the white space in the formatting of your menu.

To make sure customers remember your menu items.

  • Why do you need to seek ongoing feedback from customers and others?

To improve your menu’s performance.

Correct

You don’t need to seek ongoing feedback from customers or others.

To change your customer profile if necessary.

So you have something to contribute at staff meetings.

  • What are three ways to assess the success or popularity of your menu items?

Analyse customer profile, customer preferences, customer surveys.

Analyse customer surveys, popularity indices, sales data.

Correct

Seek feedback, use descriptive writing, itemise ingredients.

Identify organisational service style, cuisine and customer base.

  • What information should you base adjustments to your menus on?

Butcher’s tests and standard yield tests.

Portion sizes and portion yield from ingredients.

Feedback and profitability.

Correct

Culinary balance and nutritional balance.

TASK B – Short answer

Instructions:

You are to answer all questions.

Read each question carefully.

Ensure you have provided all required information.

SECTION 1: Identify customer preferences

Q1: List three (3) sources where you might obtain information on your organisation’s customer profile and food preferences.

Sales data

Surveys

Customer Interviews

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: What is the profile of customers in your workplace or training environment? Include the following in your response: age, gender, income range, social and cultural background.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q3: Analyse last month’s entrée sales data from this inner city restaurant.

Week Ending

Seared scallops

Deep-fried calamari

Grilled prawns

Ceviche

9/11/20XX

430

134

334

355

16/11/20XX

511

112

323

367

23/11/20XX

535

98

339

354

30/11/20XX

544

102

328

365

Total

2,020

446

1,324

1,441

Use the sales data to calculate the popularity index for each of the entrées. Round your answer up or down to the closest two decimal places.

Seared scallops:

38.62%

Grilled prawns:

25.31%

Deep-fried calamari:

8.53%

Ceviche:

27.54%

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q4: Based on your sales data analysis of customers’ food preferences in Q3, which of the restaurant’s entrées would you replace?

Calamari.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q5: Based on the types of entrées offered on the menu in Q3, what is the restaurant’s organisational service style and cuisine?

Sea food and Fine dining.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q6: This is the customer profile for the inner city restaurant: ‘Our customers are health-conscious female executives between 25 and 35 years of age who work in the inner city on an income of over $100,000 per year.’

Which entrée would you add to adjust the entrée selections to better meet your customers’ needs?

Beer-battered fish fingers smothered in tartare sauce and garnished with onion rings.

Gumbo of fresh prawns, spicy sausage and succulent chicken breast smothered in rich Cajun sauce on a bed of steamed rice.

Gravlax of Atlantic salmon on a bed of fresh mesclun leaves drizzled with pomegranate balsamic dressing.

Correct

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q7: Which of the following main courses would deliver the highest yield while at the same time meeting your customers’ preferences?

Surf and turf

Sirloin steak cooked to order accompanied by beer-battered prawns and potato wedges.

Vegie delight

Goat cheese tortellini, date purée, brown butter almonds and broccolini (V).

Correct

King prawn butterflies

Off-the-shell king prawns lightly spiced, battered and deep fried to a crispy finish accompanied by steamed cauliflower and broccoli smothered in rich cheese sauce.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

SECTION 2: Plan Menus

Q8: What type of menu would suit a wedding reception?

function

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q9: What type of menu would suit a prison?

Cyclical

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q10: What type of menu would you prepare for a fast food restaurant that serves Mexican cuisine?

A la carte

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q11: You’ve generated a range of ideas for menus for dishes or food production ranges. Explain the six (6) steps you would take next to coordinate the menu development process.

Sort ideas into a draft menu.

Write a list of your ingredients

Check feasibility

Identify, source and purchase all required ingredients.

Prepare, cook, and present the sample dishes.

Assess the sample dishes

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q12: You must ensure there aren’t any organisational constraints or other factors that could stop you from producing the dishes profitably and to a high standard. Identify six (6) factors to consider when assessing the merits of your dishes.

Dishes match staff skill levels.

Dishes are cooked using a variety of cooking methods. (This helps ease the load on equipment, too.)

Dishes match customer preferences according to sales data and customer profile.

There’s enough staff hand to produce the dishes within specified timeframes.

There’s enough bench and storage space in the kitchen to produce the dishes.

There’s enough small and large fixed equipment to produce the dishes during peak service time.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q13: List the four (4) factors you can vary to achieve culinary balance in your dishes or food production items.

Colour

Size and Shape

Taste

Texture

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q14: Identify four (4) ways you can achieve nutritional balance in your dishes or food production items.

Vary the cook methods

Vary ingredients

Provide nutritional value

Use delicacies and seasonally available ingredients.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q15: Identify three (3) people you can consult with at different stages of menu planning.

Managers Customers

Head chef

Kitchen hands

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

SECTION 3: COST MENUS

Q16: Identify eight components you’d need to itemise to cost dishes or food production items.

Main ingredients

Oil

Garnishes

Sauces

Salt / Pepper seasoning

Container

Serviettes

Wrapping

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q17: What documents can you use to identify the purchase price or cost per unit of each ingredient?

Supplier Invoices price list.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q18: List the three (3) standard measurements you would use when itemising ingredients and calculating portion yields and/or costs from raw ingredients. Provide an example of each.

Weight Gms/ 1KG - vegetables, meat, fish

Volume Ml/Litre - Milk, stock, Juice

Count individually - Eggs, Bacon, Bread

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q19: You buy 10 kg carrots. After washing, peeling and trimming you have 9 kg left.

Calculate the yield % of the carrots. State the formula you used. Show how you arrived at this figure.

PQ / APQ x 100

Yield%

9kg / 10 kg x 100 = 90%

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q20: You have obtained the following butcher’s yield information about whole raw chickens.

As purchased quantity (APQ)

10 kg

Edible portion quantity (EPQ)

6 kg

Usable trim weight

2.5 kg

Waste trim weight

1.5 kg

Calculate the yield % of the chicken. State the formula you used. Show how you arrived at this figure.

EPQ / APQ x 100 = Yield

6000 / 10.000 x 00 = 60%

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q21: Calculate the usable trim % of the chicken. State the formula you used. Show how you arrived at this figure.

Usable trim / APQ x 100 = usable trim %

2.5kg / 10.000 x100=25%

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q22: Calculate the waste % of the chicken. State the formula you used. Show how you arrived at this figure.

Waste trim weight / APQ x 100 = waste% = 15%

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q23: Use the information below to calculate the actual cost of the asparagus.

State the three (3) formulas you used and the steps you took to arrive at this cost.

Ingredients

Qty.

Unit

Purchase unit

Purchase unit price

Cost

Yield

Total cost

Asparagus

150

g

1 kg

$5.95

75%

$1.19

  • Formula 1

Quantity required / Yield% = purchase weight

150g / 75 x 100= 200 g

  • Formula 2

Purchase weight / purchase unit x 100 = usage %

200 g / 1000 g x 100 = 20%

  • Formula 3

Purchase unit cost x usage % = actual food cost

$5.95 x 20 / 100 = $1.19

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q24: Calculate the profitable selling price of a dish with a food cost per portion of $7.22 and a standard food cost percentage of 28%.

State the formula you used. Show how you arrived at this price. Round your answer up to two decimal places.

Food cost per portion x 100 / Standard food cost% - Selling price

7.22 x 100 / 28 = $25.79

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q25: Use the information provided to assess the cost-effectiveness of these dishes.

Dish name

Section

Portion size

Food cost /portion

Food cost %

Raw selling price

Adjusted selling price

Orange cake

Pâtissier

Dessert

$1.58

17%

$9.29

$9.50

Profiteroles

Pâtissier

Dessert

$3.08

32%

$9.62

$9.75

Brandy snap

Pâtissier

Dessert

$2.11

22%

$9.59

$9.50

  • Which dish provides the highest yield, is marked up the most and is the most profitable?

Orange cake

  • What is the least profitable menu item?

Profiteroles

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

SECTION 4: write menu content

Q26: Use your creativity to promote sales.

Rewrite this dish description using words that better appeal to well-travelled baby boomers with high buying power in a fine dining restaurant.

Be sure to include geographical descriptors and a style of cuisine.

  • Grilled fillet of snapper with lemon butter sauce and seasonal vegetables

Grilled Tasmania Snapper with rustic garden vegetable and lemon citrus beurre blanc.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q27: You’re promoting the sale of a new spinach and ricotta lasagne. List seven (7) dish characteristics you could use in the menu description to promote sales. Provide an example of each one.

Cuisine Style Southern Italian

Geographical locally grown Tasmania spinach

Cooking method freshly baked

Texture Al Dente

Service temperature hot

Flavour

Tangy

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q28: Describe the difference in formatting between a three-course table d’hote menu listed by title only and an à la carte style listed by title and description.

The number of dishes on the menu and how you list them influences the menu's size and shape.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q29: Identify the typical characteristics of menus you need to keep in mind when writing menu content and formatting your menu.

Name of the establishment

Menu courses or selections

Price

Name of the dish

Description of the dish

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q30: Seasonal products and commodities influence menu content. Explain how to deal with this.

Seasonal products and commodities influence menu content. You can either change your menu with the seasons or slide a separate inclusion into the menu listing the seasonal specials.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q31: Identify two (2) ways you can use technology to help you calculate yield and costs, and to write menu content.

excel - Spread sheets formulas

Spellcheck to identify and correct spelling and grammatical errors.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

SECTION 5: Evaluate menu success

Q32: What are four (4) ways you can get ongoing feedback from customers and others to improve menu performance.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q33: List three (3) ways you can assess the success and popularity of menu items.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q34: What is a customer survey and how can it help you?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q35: Describe three (3) ways you could adjust menus based on feedback and profitability.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

TASK c – project

Learner assessment guide and evidence

This assessment requires you to identify customer preferences, and plan, cost and write an à la carte seasonal menu.

You are required to do the following:

Complete Tasks 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

Describe your workplace or training environment’s style.

Develop a customer profile for your workplace or training environment.

Identify customer preferences in your workplace or training environment.

Develop and cost a seasonal à la carte menu that incorporates ethnic food preferences of customer groups.

Format and upload the à la carte menu.

Develop and determine a selling price for a table d’hote menu.

Answer all the questions.

Attach organisational information to this assessment when requested within each task.

Task 1 Identify customer profile

  • Research information about your workplace or training environment and customers.
  • Sources of organisational information could include manual documentation, computerised records and reports, and your colleagues, management or other staff.
  • Answer all the questions.
  • Complete all tables.
  • Attach copies of organisational information used to identify customer preferences.

Q1: Research information about your workplace or training environment’s cuisine, menu and service style.

Category

Organisational information

Style of cuisine

Menu style

Service style

Sequence of courses

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: Develop a profile of your workplace or training environment’s customers. List the sources of organisational information you used to develop this profile.

Profile category

Profile information

Sources of customer profile information

Age range

about religion or vegan/vegetarians...

just example above.

Gender

Income level and/or buying power

Social and cultural background

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q3: Based on your current menu, what are your customers’ food preferences? Use organisational documents, POS or other computer systems and manual or computerised reports to complete the table.

If your workplace or training environment’s menu does not match the headings provided, please modify heading to reflect your menu structure. Attach one copy of each type of organisational information used to identify customer preferences to this assessment.

Food preferences

Organisational information

First course / entrée

Main course / meal

Dessert / sweet item

Highest selling / most popular menu item

Lowest selling / least popular menu item

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Checklist

  • Ensure all tables are completed.
  • Attach copies of organisational information used to identify customer preferences.

Task 2: Develop a seasonal à la carte menu (background information)

  • You can choose to develop a seasonal à la carte menu for your workplace or training organisation or use the scenario information provided.
  • If choosing to develop a menu for your workplace or training environment, it must have appropriate and adequate equipment, facilities and staff for this menu style. For example, if you work in a café or fast food establishment then it will be difficult to create an à la carte menu for this task because you don’t offer this type of food.
  • Complete all tasks.

Scenario information

You are developing a new winter à la carte dinner menu for Ashton’s, a casual dining restaurant that seats 60 customers. The menu items are presented under four sections: starters, entrée, main course and desserts. All meals are served plated to the table by service staff. The restaurant caters mainly for adults ranging from 25 to 45 years old. It’s located in a middle-class area with a significant population of office, business and management professionals. The population is very culturally diverse, predominantly European and Asian cultural backgrounds. The restaurant owners have noticed a steady trend towards customers preferring healthier meal options (mainly low-fat, low-sugar options) and increasing requests for vegetarian menu options.

Customers do not tend to spend more than one and a half to two hours in the restaurant during dinner service. On average, 70% of customer’s order two courses: entrée/starter and main course or main course and dessert. Only 20% order three courses.

The current menu is broken down into four sections.

  • Starters – snacks, dips, shared platters, breads, etc.
  • Entrées, salads and light meals
  • Main course
  • Dessert

The menu style is modern Australian with dishes from a wide variety of cuisines, including Malaysian, Chinese, Thai, Italian and Greek. Some dishes offered during the winter months are influenced by German and Hungarian cuisines.

Prices range from $10 to $15 for starters, $12 to $18 for entrées, $22 to $35 for main course and $10 to $15 for desserts. The restaurant has found that customers are resistant to dishes outside of these price ranges unless they can see value for money, or the dish is rare or unique.

There are five staff rostered in the kitchen most nights of the week: the chef, two cooks (two years’ and five years’ experience post-apprenticeship), one second-year apprentice and a kitchen hand. The following equipment is available in the restaurant kitchen.

Large equipment

Small equipment

Two ovens

Four open-range stove-top burners (one is a wok burner) above one oven

One griddle and two open-range stove-top burners above the second oven

One salamander

One double-vat deep fryer

One combi oven (convection and steam)

One 20 litre floor-mounted planetary mixer

Walk-in cool room, dry store area and large double-door freezer

Hot bain-marie with under-display plate warmer

Cold bain-marie with under-display refrigeration cabinet

Food processer and blender

Microwave oven

Slicer

Mincer

Pasta machine

Task 2.1 Develop a seasonal à la carte menu

Step 1

  • Brainstorm or research a range of ideas for your menu. Make sure you include at least one seasonal dish.
  • Develop a rough draft of your menu.

Step 2

  • Go to the ‘Additional documents’ folder on the LMS and open SITHKOP002 Menu checklists template and assess the feasibility of at least six (6) dishes by completing the Feasibility checklist. Choose dishes from a variety of courses within the menu.

Step 3

  • Using the same template assess the culinary and nutritional balance for each dish evaluated in the previous task and complete the Culinary and nutritional balance checklist.

Step 4

  • Finally, assess the feasibility and balance of the overall menu by completing the Menu evaluation checklist.

Step 5

  • Modify your draft menu (if necessary) to overcome any issues identified when checking feasibility and balance.

Step 6

  • Prepare, cook and present at least two dishes on your draft menu. You can use two (2) dishes from your feasibility study list if you wish. You do not have to prepare dishes personally; other members of the culinary team can do so under your direct supervision.

Step 7

  • Discuss the merits of each dish with relevant personnel, such as colleagues, service or culinary staff, supervisors and managers. Attach photos of finished dishes.

Step 8

  • Ask members of the evaluation panel to complete an evaluation feedback form for all dishes presented to the evaluation panel. Photocopy the evaluation form provided as many times as necessary.

Step 9

  • Discuss your draft menu and the results of your feasibility and dish evaluation testing with relevant personnel and/or your trainer. Ensure you gain approval for your proposed menu before continuing with Task 3.

Task 2.2: Question and answer

Q1: What issues did you identify when checking feasibility of your dishes?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: What issues did you identify when checking the culinary and nutritional balance of your dishes and menu?

pag 20

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q3: What dishes (if any) had to be modified or changed as a result of your evaluation process?

pag 23

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q4: Briefly explain how this menu meets the preferences of your customer profile.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q5: List the seasonal dishes you have included in your menu. Explain why they are suitable for a winter menu.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q6: What dishes on your menu originate from other cuisines or cultures? List the dishes and their cuisine, country or culture of origin.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q7: Summarise the responses and feedback obtained from your evaluation panel. Include positive, negative and constructive comments made about dishes and the menu by panel members.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q8: What changes did you make to the menu and selected dishes based on their feedback and comments?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Checklist

  • Attach copies the following documents to your completed assessment:
  • Menu or dish research and evaluation information.
  • Draft menu.
  • Photos of your sample dishes.
  • A minimum of two (2) evaluation feedback forms completed by participants in the evaluation process.
  • Ensure all the questions are answered.
  • Submit all completed documents.

NOTE: Information, recipes and your draft menu will be required to complete Task 3.

Task 3: Cost menu

Step 1

  • Itemise the components of all dishes on your à la carte menu. They can be hand-written or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.

Step 2

  • Research costs for all components to enable you to determine costs and selling prices. Information can be obtained from your workplace or training organisation’s purchasing staff or organisational purchasing documentation, by contacting suppliers directly or using your internet search engine.

Step 3

  • Calculate portion yields for all raw ingredients for all dishes on your à la carte menu.
  • Go to the ‘Additional documents’ folder on the LMS and open SITHKOP002 Recipe costings and manually calculate the portion yields and costs of raw ingredients for at least one dish. Alternatively, you can use your workplace or training environment’s standard format. Show the formulas used, your calculations and results for each component of the dish. Save your file.
  • All other dishes on the menu can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Use the SITHKOP002 Raw ingredient yield test percentages table provided in your course files or your workplace or training organisation’s standardised yield test percentages when calculating costs for all raw ingredients. If yield percentage is not available, use most similar ingredient percentage.

Step 4

  • Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes on your menu. Remember to include costs for all components of a dish.
  • Determine selling prices for all menu items.
  • If developing a menu for your workplace or training organisation, use their mark-up, standard food cost percentages (SFC%) or profit margins to determine the selling price.
  • Ashton’s SFC% ranges are 25 to 30% on starters and entrées, 30 to 35% on main courses, 15 to 20% on fruit-based desserts and 27 to 32% on all other desserts.
  • Calculate the menu price for one menu item manually, showing all formulas, calculations and results.
  • All other menu items can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet. Show how the menu price changes depending on the SFC% used.

Task 3.1: Question and answer

Q1: Assess the cost-effectiveness of your menu items. Which items are within the price ranges for current menu courses? Which items are not?

Menu items within current price range

Menu items NOT within current price range

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: Choose one dish that is not within the current menu price range. Describe any changes you can make to the recipe and its ingredients to ensure the dish’s selling price is within the business’s current price range while still maximising profitability.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q3: Which dish is the least profitable on your menu? Why is it the least profitable?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q4: List the four (4) most profitable dishes on your menu.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

  • Checklist
  • Answer all the questions.
  • Upload all calculations completed using computer software packages (for example, spreadsheets).
  • Attach copies of the following documents to your assessment.
  • Your itemised recipe components list.
  • A sample of documents or research used to provide purchase costs for recipe components.
  • All documents containing manual and computerised yield, cost and selling price calculations are to be submitted to your assessor at the completion of this Assessment.

NOTE: Your menu and the results of your pricing calculations will be required to complete Task 4.

Task 4: Write a menu content

Complete all the following tasks:

  • Write menu content for all dishes on your menu.
  • Make sure your menu content:
  • is descriptive and creatively expressed
  • appeals to the customer base
  • fits business’s service style
  • promotes sales
  • uses correct names or terminology for styles of cuisine, dishes, cooking methods and ingredients
  • Use computer technology to format your menu so it is presentable to customers and meets organisational standards.

Task 4.1 Question and answer

Q1: Describe how you will present the menu to customers, for example, folders, covers, boards or binding. Include details of colour schemes, pictures, icons, logos, symbols and other decorative items.

pag 51 to 53

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: Explain why you think this method of presentation is appropriate for the style of menu and restaurant.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

  • Checklist
  • Answer all the questions.
  • Upload menu and attach to your assessment.

Task 5: Prepare and cost a table d’hote menu

Step 1

  • Develop a table d’hote menu for your workplace, training organisation or the Ashton’s restaurant scenario provided in Task 2.
  • The table d’hote menu should include three choices within each course.
  • The table d’hote menu can be developed using menu items from the à la carte menu developed, costed and written for Tasks 2, 3 and 4.
  • Alternatively, you can develop a menu using new recipes. All new recipes must be costed using the same formulas and techniques used to cost the à la carte menu in Task 3. Descriptions for each menu item must be written following the menu content parameters outlined in Task 4.
  • The menu should meet the following parameters.
  • Include a balanced variety of dishes.
  • Include at least one vegetarian option in each course.
  • A maximum SFC% of 30% for the overall menu.

Step 2

  • Determine a selling price for the menu. The menu should be priced in between $45 to $60.

Step 3

  • Use computer technology to format your menu. The table d’hote menu must meet the following criteria:
  • Able to be inserted into the à la carte menu.
  • Selling price for the menu clearly displayed.
  • Presentable to customers and meets organisational standards.
  • Checklist
  • Upload menu and attach to your assessment.
  • Submit any research or documentation, all manual or computerised calculations, and the draft and completed table d’hote menu.

NOTE: Submit all documentation, answered assessment questions, and relating evidence via LMS.

TASK d – project

Learner assessment guide and evidence

This assessment requires you to identify customer preferences, and plan, cost and write an à la carte seasonal menu.

You are required to do the following:

Complete Tasks 1, 2 and 3.

Develop and cost three menus: buffet, degustation and cyclical.

Format and upload each of the menus.

Determine a selling price for each menu.

Answer all the questions.

Attach organisational information to this assessment when requested within each task.

Task 1: Develop and cost a degustation menu

You work in a conference centre and a large national corporation is holding their annual management event at your venue soon. The first day is allocated to a full-day board of directors and executive management meeting. The event organiser has asked for a set degustation menu to be served for lunch.

Their brief includes the following requests:

  • Eight to ten courses.
  • At least 70 to 80% of courses to be savoury with the balance sweet, dessert-style dishes.
  • At least four meat-based dishes in the savoury courses.
  • A consistent theme to the menu – preferably dishes that reflect a style of cuisine or country.
  • Dishes are not to be heavily spiced, for example, extensive use of hot chillies.
  • Each course is to be served on platters with four portions on each platter. Diners will serve themselves a portion from the platter.
  • There will be 40 guests for lunch.

Complete all the following steps:

Step 1

  • Research and prepare a degustation menu based on the client’s preferences and requests.
  • Itemise the components of all dishes in your menu. They can be listed manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.

Step 2

  • Research costs for all components to enable you to determine costs and selling prices. Information can be obtained from your workplace or training organisation’s purchasing staff or organisational purchasing documentation, by contacting suppliers directly or using your internet search engine.

Step 3

  • Calculate portion yields for all raw ingredients for all dishes on your à la carte menu.
  • All dishes on the menu can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Use the Raw ingredient yield test percentages table provided in your course files or your workplace or training organisation’s standardised yield test percentages when calculating costs for all raw ingredients. If yield percentage is not available, use most similar ingredient percentage.
  • Step 4
  • Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes on your menu. Remember to include costs for all components of a dish.

Step 5

  • Determine selling price for the menu. This price will be presented to the event organiser with the menu for final approval.
  • The conference centre aims to achieve a SFC% of between 27 to 32%.
  • All menu items can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Show how the menu price changes depending on the SFC% used.
  • Step 6
  • Prepare a menu for the event. It will be placed on the table above each guest’s place setting.
  • It must include the name of each dish and a description of the dish.
  • The description should be appealing and use correct names or terminology for styles of cuisine, dishes, cooking methods and ingredients listed in the description.

Task 1.1: Question and answer

Q1: How has the client’s requests and customer preferences influenced your menu planning decisions?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: What changes did you have to make to your draft menu and recipes to ensure you met the conference centre’s SFC% for buffet menus?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

  • Checklist
  • Ensure all the questions are answered.
  • Attach copies of the following documents to your assessment:
  • Your itemised recipe components list.
  • All documents containing manual or computerised yield, cost and selling price calculations.
  • The final formatted version of your degustation menu.
  • Submit all completed menus, calculations, manual or upload computer-based documents and required tasks.

Task 2: Develop and cost a buffet menu

Day two of the annual management event is a series of seminars, workshops and guest speakers for all executive and senior management of the corporation. A buffet dinner is planned for that evening.

Their brief for the buffet dinner includes the following requests.

  • A plated cold entrée to be served at the table. This can be an individually plated meal or a shared platter.
  • Main course and dessert courses served from the buffet.
  • A variety of hot and cold options provided for the main course.
  • At least one hot vegetarian main course option.
  • Dessert can include hot options but is not a mandatory requirement.

The organiser anticipates 250 guests for dinner on tables of ten to 12.

Complete all the following steps:

Step 1

  • Research and prepare a buffet menu based on the client’s preferences and requests.
  • Itemise the components of all dishes in your menu. They can be listed manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.

Step 2

  • Research costs for all components to enable you to determine costs and selling prices. Information can be obtained from your workplace or training organisation’s purchasing staff or organisational purchasing documentation, by contacting suppliers directly or using your internet search engine.

Step 3

  • Calculate portion yields for all raw ingredients for all dishes on your buffet menu.
  • All dishes on the menu can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Use the ‘Raw ingredient yield test percentages’ table provided in your course files or your workplace or training organisation’s standardised yield test percentages when calculating costs for all raw ingredients. If yield percentage is not available, use most similar ingredient percentage.
  • Step 4
  • Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes on your menu. Remember to include costs for all components of a dish.

Step 5

  • Determine selling price for the menu. This price will be presented to the event organiser with the menu for final approval.
  • The conference centre aims to achieve an overall SFC% of 28% for buffet menus.
  • All menu items and the overall menu price can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Checklist
  • Ensure all the questions are answered.
  • Attach copies of the following documents to your assessment.
  • Your itemised recipe components list.
  • All documents containing manual or computerised yield, cost and selling price calculations.
  • The final formatted version of your degustation menu.
  • Submit all completed menus, calculations, manual or upload computer-based documents and required tasks.

Task 3: Develop and cost a cyclical menu

Your work in an aged-care facility. You have to prepare a three-week cyclical menu for the residents for breakfast, lunch and dinner. There are 150 residents in the facility.

Breakfast includes a standardised range of cereals, juices, fruits and toast that are served every day. You only need to plan for one hot breakfast item. Hot egg-based breakfast items are limited to a maximum of four times in one weekly cycle. Only 50% of residents eat the hot breakfast option.

Lunch is the main meal of the day. It consists of one entrée, a choice of two main courses and one dessert.

Dinner is a lighter meal consisting of an entrée (often soup), a light, snack-style main meal and a fruit-based dessert. Portion sizes for the dinner main course are smaller than for lunch.

The following factors must be considered when planning your cyclical menu.

  • Menu items must be able to be prepared in bulk.
  • The facility has set meal times. All meals must be able to be plated and served at that time.
  • Some residents eat in their rooms. These meals are plated first, placed in insulated covers, arranged on pre-set trays and sent by trolley to their rooms.
  • Many residents cannot eat very hard or crunchy items, such as whole nuts.
  • Residents tend to eat smaller portion sizes. On average, portions are 20% smaller than normal. For example, if the standard portion for beef casserole is 250 g, residents are served a 200 g portion. A recipe that yields ten standard 250 g portions will yield 12.5 200 g portions.
  • Menu items must be nutritionally balanced across a day and weekly cycle. Fruit, vegetables and sources of fibre and calcium are important components in the residents’ diet.

To keep costs down, the facility’s management encourages the use of frozen, pre-prepared or convenience foods, for example, use of powdered soup bases. The facility has a budget of $18 per day per resident for your menu. The costs for standard breakfast items (cereals, juices, etc.) are not included in this price. This target does not have to be achieved on a daily basis as long as it averages out within each week period of the three-week cycle.

The facility’s kitchen has limited space and facilities. The following equipment is available.

Large equipment

Small equipment

One commercial oven

Four open-range stove-top burners above the oven

One salamander

One combi oven (convection and steam)

One single-vat deep fryer

One bench-mounted planetary mixer

Small walk-in cool room, open shelving dry store area and single-door freezer

Hot bain-marie with under-display plate warmer

Food processer and blender

Microwave oven

Pots, pans, frypans, stockpots, etc.

Complete all the following steps:

Step 1

  • Research and prepare a draft cyclical menu based on resident preferences and the facility’s requirements. Upload this draft to submit later.

Step 2

  • Itemise the components of all dishes in your menu. They can be listed manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.

Step 3

  • Research costs for all components to enable you to determine costs and selling prices. Information can be obtained from your workplace or training organisation’s purchasing staff or organisational purchasing documentation, by contacting suppliers directly or using your internet search engine. Remember to consider convenience options as a replacement for fresh and raw ingredients.

Step 4

  • Calculate portion yields for all raw ingredients for all dishes on your cyclical menu.
  • All dishes on the menu can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Use the Raw ingredient yield test percentages table provided in your course files or your workplace or training organisation’s standardised yield test percentages when calculating costs for all raw ingredients. If yield percentage is not available, use most similar ingredient percentage.

Step 5

  • Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes on your menu. Remember to include costs for all components of a dish and to adjust portion sizes according to residents’ needs.
  • Determine total cost per day for the menu.

NOTE:

  • All menu items and the overall menu price can be calculated manually or using computer technology such as spreadsheet software.
  • Revise your menu if necessary, to ensure you meet budgetary constraints. Recalculate costs for any new or adjusted menu items.
  • Format your cyclical menu in preparation of presentation to the facility manager and accountant. This menu should include portion costs for each dish and daily costs per resident.

Task 3.1: Question and answer

Q1: What items in your initial draft menu did you have to replace or modify to meet the budgetary restrictions of the aged-care facility?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

  • Checklist
  • Ensure all the questions are answered.
  • Attach copies of the following documents to your assessment:
  • Your itemised recipe components list.
  • All documents containing manual or computerised yield, cost and selling price calculations musts be submitted.
  • The draft and final formatted version of your cyclical menu.
  • Submit all completed menus, calculations, manual or upload computer-based documents and required tasks.

Practical checklist

To be completed by the assessor.

Learner’s name:

Did the learner successfully demonstrate evidence of their ability to do the following?

Completed

Yes

No

Identified and evaluated food preferences of differing customer bases and used it to inform menu planning.

Generated a range of ideas for menus for dishes or food production ranges, and assessed their merits against customer or client requirements.

Chose menu items to meet customer preferences, availability of seasonal products, and appropriateness to food outlet.

Developed menus that use different dishes or food production ranges.

Set degustation menu

Buffet menu

Cyclical menu

Included balanced variety of dishes or food production items for the style of service and cuisine.

Itemised proposed components of included dishes or food production items.

Calculated portion yields and costs from raw ingredients using manual or computerised techniques.

Assessed the cost-effectiveness of proposed dishes or food production items and chose menu items that provide high yield.

Priced menu items to ensure maximum profitability using industry or organisational profit margins, mark-up procedures and rates.

Compared menu items based on their anticipated yield, budgetary constraints and profitability.

Identified unprofitable menu items and adjusted menus to include high-yield dishes.

Wrote menus creatively using words that appeal to customer base and fit with the business service style.

Used correct names for style of cuisine.

Used descriptive writing to promote sale of menu items.

TASK e – project

Learner assessment guide and evidence

This assessment requires you to evaluate the success of a menu. You are required to do the following:

Complete Task 1.

Answer all the questions.

Attach organisational information to this assessment when submitting the assessment.

Task 1: Obtain feedback

Step 1

  • Obtain feedback on a menu you have developed for your workplace or training organisation. You must seek feedback from at least two sources. Sources include the following.
  • Customer satisfaction discussions with:
  • customers
  • employees during the course of each business day
  • Customer surveys.
  • Improvements suggested by:
  • customers
  • managers
  • peers
  • staff
  • supervisors
  • suppliers
  • Regular staff meetings that involve menu discussions.
  • Seeking staff suggestions for menu items.
  • Step 2
  • Document the results of your feedback.
  • Take minutes or record formal meeting discussions.
  • Collate and summarise customer survey results.
  • Document verbal feedback obtained through informal discussions with customers, managers, supervisors, staff, peers or suppliers.
  • Step 3
  • Evaluate the success of menu items by evaluating sales data. Sources include the following:
  • Manual customer accounts, kitchen order dockets or waiters’ dockets.
  • Computerised customer order forms.
  • Computerised reports such as service period or daily sales figures for menu items.
  • Step 4
  • Compare sales data indicating the performance of menu items against customer and other feedback information.

Step 5

  • Identify any changes required to be made to the menu or individual menu items based on feedback and sales data.

Task 1.1: Question and answer

Q1: Why is it important to seek feedback and evaluate the success of a menu and individual menu items?

pag 61

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q2: Which menu items regularly record the highest number of sales?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q3: Do these items also regularly receive positive feedback and customer satisfaction ratings from customers? Why/why not?

pag 62

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q4: Are your highest-selling menu items the most profitable items on your menu?

yes or not

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q5: Are the menu items you obtain the most positive feedback about from customers the most profitable items on your menu?

yes or not

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q6: If you answered yes to both Q4 and Q5, briefly discuss how this impacts the food outlet’s overall profitability.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q7: If you answered no to both Q4 and Q5, briefly discuss how this impacts the food outlet’s overall profitability.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q8: What menu items regularly record the lowest number of sales?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q9: Do these items receive positive or negative feedback and comments from customers? Briefly summarise the type of feedback obtained.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q10: Are your lowest-selling menu items the most profitable or least profitable items on your menu?

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q11: Are the menu items you obtain the most negative feedback about from customers the most profitable or least profitable items on your menu?

Response can be most profitable or least profitable. Explanation of response is not required.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q12: If you answered most profitable to both Q4 and Q5, briefly discuss how you think you can increase the popularity of this dish to increase sales and therefore revenue.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

Q13: If you answered least profitable to both Q4 and Q5, briefly discuss how you can adjust the menu or menu item(s) to improve popularity, sales and customer satisfaction.

Satisfactory Unsatisfactory

  • Checklist
  • Ensure all the questions are answered.
  • Submit the following documentation (where applicable) with your assessment:
  • Summaries of customer survey results.
  • Summaries of formal and informal discussions, including meetings and verbal discussions.
  • Summaries of sales data for the menu and menu items, for example, daily or weekly summary reports, or X/Z reads from cash registers or POS systems.

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